Chapter Three: The Perils of Cupid

Passion for Life | Perils of Cupid | Travels with Father
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Chapter Overview

Young Indy travels to Florence, Italy with his parents and Helen Seymour, his tutor. Helen gives him lessons in physics, with examples from Galileo and Leonardo da Vinci, along with tours to see the splendors of Renaissance art. While Indy's father is temporarily away, the family is charmed by the generous attention of Italian opera composer Giacomo Puccini. Indy is at first fascinated by the dynamic Puccini, but comes to realize that Puccini's devotion to his mother is more than mere courtesy. He is troubled by the turmoil it creates with his mother's emotions.

On a visit to Vienna, young Indy and his family stay with the American Ambassador in Austria during a flourishing cultural period in the history of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. At the Spanish Riding School, Indy meets Princess Sophie, the daughter of the heir to the throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand. He suffers the pangs of first love when he realizes how impossible it is to be a friend of a princess. He is given some advice on the meaning of love from the leaders of the new science of psychology from its founding masters Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Alfred Adler.

Key Topics:

Italian opera, Psychology, Renaissance art and the significance of Galileo and da Vinci

Historic People:

Giacomo Puccini-- Italian composer of operas
Sigmund Freud— Austrian who founded the psychoanalytic movement
Carl Jung—Swiss psychiatrist and co-founder of analytic psychology
Alfred Adler—Austrian psychiatrist
Princess Sophie—daughter of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

People and Topics


Sigmund Freud

Descriptor

Austrian who founded the psychoanalytic movement of psychology. Freud is best remembered for his theories regarding sexual desire and the unconscious mind.


Books

Freud, Sigmund. Autobiography. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1935.

Gay, Peter. FREUD: A Life in Our Time. New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, Auckland: Anchor Books Doubleday, 1988.


Websites

Freud Museum- London

Freud Museum- Vienna

LOC- Freud

Freud Archives

Personality Theories- Freud


Carl Jung

Descriptor

Swiss psychiatrist and co-founder of analytic psychology. Believed that the psyche should be explored in a variety of ways, including: dreams, art, mythology, world religion and philosophy.


Books

Bair, Deirdre. Jung A Biography. Boston, London, and New York: Little, Brown, and Company, 2003.

Dunne, Claire. Carl Jung: Wounded Healer of the Soul. New York: Parabola Books, 2000.


Websites

Jung Bio

Personality Theories- Jung

The Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism


Franz Ferdinand

Descriptor

Heir to the Austria-Hungarian throne whose assassination in June, 1914 triggered World War I.


Books

Williamson, Samuel R., Russel van Wyk. July 1914: Soldiers, Statesmen, and the Coming of the Great War- A Brief Documentary History. New York: Beford/St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Cassels, Lavender. The Archduke and the Assassin: Sarajevo June 28th, 1914. London: Frederick Muller, 1984.


Websites

Archduke Bio

Assassination of the Archduke

PBS-Causes of WWI


Causes of World War I

Descriptor

In 1914 Europe was on the brink of war. Years of militarism, growing nationalism, imperialism, and formation of alliances pushed European countries closer and closer to a war unlike anything seen before. In July, 1914 war was declared and the world quickly fell in to the devastating conflict. Four years later millions were dead, wounded, missing, and Europe was in an economic crisis that would pave the way to another, even more devastating and costly war.


Books

Williamson, Samuel R., Russel van Wyk. July 1914: Soldiers, Statesmen, and the Coming of the Great War- A Brief Documentary History. New York: Beford/St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Fromkin, David. Europe's Last Summer: Who Started the GGreat War in 1914?. New York: Knopf, 2004.


Websites

How It Began

BBC- Causes of WWI

PBS-Causes of WWI

Causes of WWI

Archduke Bio


Giacomo Puccini

Descriptor

Italian composer of operas. Major works include: La Bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly.


Books

Phillips-Matz, Mary Jane. Puccini, A Biography. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 2002.

Wilson, Conrad. 20th Century Composers: Giacomo Puccini. London: Phaidon Press, Ltd., 1997.


Websites

Puccini Museum

Puccini Festival

Puccini Bio & Discography

Puccini.com

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Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements The Perils of Cupid.


Psychology--Charting the Human Mind


The analysis of the mind and the exploration of human motives and behavior are some of the breakthrough areas of study in the 19th and 20th century, shaped by visionary thinkers and landmark experiments. This documentary tracks the development of the first scientific approaches of Wilhelm Wundt, the practical applications of Sigmund Freud, the controversial philosophy of eugenics and the startling discovers of B.F. Skinner and Stanley Milgram. Produced and Written by Adam Sternberg and Kristin Pichaske.

Running Time: (0:26:33)
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Sigmund Freud--Exploring the Unconscious


There was a time where doctor-patient relationships were strictly authoritarian -- doctors did not listen, but rather prescribed -- and those suffering from mental problems endured cold and brutal recuperative programs. Sigmund Freud changed all that with the development of psychoanalysis, wherein he listened to the patient, mapped the unconscious and elevated the study of dreams from mysticism to science. Freud's bold and occasionally regrettable conclusions stirred the conservative society of his time, yet still hold considerable influence on the world today. Produced and Written by Adam Sternberg.

Running Time: (0:21:56)

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Carl Jung and the Journey of Self Discovery


A protégé of Freud, Carl Gustav Jung felt that his mentor's ideas were too limiting, and he sought other sources of influence on the behavior of individuals and cultures. It was Jung's explorations that allow us to identify how we typify people and behavior into archetypes, and how the underpinnings of culture and society shape who we are. Through it all, Jung remained steadfastly committed to the strength and quality of the individual, regardless of what the outlying society dictates the norm to be. Produced by Adam Sternberg. Written by Adam Sternberg and Kristin Pichaske.

Running Time: (0:19:30)

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The Archduke's Last Journey--End of an Era


In June 1914, a special train carried Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne, to Sarajevo. Terrorists would strike, and a 19-year old gunman killed the Archduke and his wife. A chain-reaction disaster followed, as a web of diplomatic alliances dragged the world into a war that would kill millions, maim millions more, and bring an end to royal dominance of Europe. Produced and Written by Sharon Wood.

Running Time: (0:20:55)

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Powder Keg--Europe 1900 to 1914


Between August 1914 and November 1918, 27 countries would declare war. Over 60 million men from around the world would fight and over eight-and-a-half million would die. In the summer of 1914, none of the world's leaders set out to wage the most destructive war the world had yet known, and yet they did. Why? Produced and Written by Sharon Wood.

Running Time: (0:26:06)

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It's Opera!


Most everyone can recognize the sound of opera when they hear it, but few of us know what opera really is. What is the secret to opera? Discover how the complex interplay of multiple art forms -- song, music, costume, stage direction and drama -- blur to become a truly unique experience by visiting a modern class of opera performers, learning of the historic origins of opera, and following a performance of The Marriage of Figaro. Produced and Written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:29:02)


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Giacomo Puccini--Music of the Heart


To this day, an opera by Giacamo Puccini will play to a packed house. Puccini's works -- including La Bohème -- are engaging stories set to stirring music that are still very much in demand. Rather than craft operas about mythological concepts, momentous historic events or classical literature, Puccini's stories were about of real people in relatable circumstances, inspired by Puccini's own life experience. Produced and Written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:25:34)

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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: The Perils of Cupid

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in The Perils of Cupid.


How the Monuments Men Saved Italy’s Treasures

Smithsonian.com
1/15/2014

Swam through the sea a crescent of sunwashed white houses, lavender hillsides and rust red roofs, and a high campanile whose bells, soft across the water, stole to the mental ear. No country in the world has, for me, the breathtaking beauty of Italy.” It was the fall of 1943. A couple of months earlier, the Sicilian landings of July 10 had marked the beginning of the Allied Italian campaign. The two British officers, who had met and become instant friends during the recently concluded push to drive the Germans from North Africa, were assigned to the Allied Military Government for Occupied Territories (AMGOT), which took over control of Italy as the country was being liberated by the Allies. Edward “Teddy” Croft-Murray, who in civilian life was a curator of prints and drawings at the British Museum in London, belonged to the small Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) unit inside AMGOT. Its task—dramatized in George Clooney’s new film, The Monuments Men, celebrating the unit’s exploits—would be to safeguard landmarks and works of art from war damage. Croft-Murray had, Fielden wrote in his memoirs, a “twinkling eye in a large face which was attached to the most untidy imaginable body...the Ancient Monument he called himself. God be praised, I said, for someone like this.”


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Mechanical Matchmaking: The Science of Love in the 1920s

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Online dating sites like eHarmony and OkCupid claim they can find you the perfect romantic match by using algorithms. These kinds of sites have catchy slogans like "date smarter, not harder," implying that they've finally perfected a scientific approach to matchmaking. Just answer a few questions, and their super-secret love science will find the person who is right for you.


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It was the great flash point of the 20th century, an act that set off a chain reaction of calamity: two World Wars, 80 million deaths, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Hitler, the atomic bomb. Yet it might never have happened - we're now told had Gavrilo Princip not got hungry for a sandwich.


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Dame Margot Fonteyn is still remembered as one of the greatest ballerinas of the 20th century, revered worldwide for her duets with Rudolf Nureyev and still seen as a national treasure in her native Britain. Her role in a plot to overthrow the pro-U.S. government of Panama in 1959 was all but forgotten until recently, when Britain's National Archives released formerly classified British diplomatic cables on the matter.


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Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


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