Chapter Seven: Love’s Sweet Song

Spring Break Adventure | Love's Sweet Song | Trenches of Hell
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Chapter Overview

Indiana Jones finds that love and politics don't mix when he visits the British Isles. Landing in Ireland right before the Easter Rebellion, Indy mixes romance and revolutionary politics when he falls for beautiful young Colleen whose brother is mixed up in the Irish resistance movement. Across the waters in England he encounters a similar problem when his love affair with a strong-willed young woman is derailed by her fervent belief in the women's suffrage movement and her need for independence. Desperate street brawls, a terrifying Zeppelin raid and a seriocomic dinner party with Winston Churchill provide plenty of thrills in this exciting romantic adventure. Guest stars include Elizabeth Hurley and Academy Award-winning actress Vanessa Redgrave.

Key Topics:

The Easter Rebellion; London Zeppelin raids and the Suffragette movement

Historic People:

W.B. Yeats—Dublin-born poet
Sean O’Casey—Irish Playwright
Sean Lemass—Dublin-born political activist
Winston Churchill—First Lord of the Admiralty and later Prime Minister of Great Britain
Sylvia Pankhurst—leader of the suffrage movement in England

People and Topics


W.B. Yeats

Descriptor

Dublin-born poet and dramatist who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923. Yeats was a pillar in the Irish Literary Revival of the early twentieth century. Famous works include: The Second Coming (1920), The Tower (1928), and The Winding Stair and Other Poems (1929).


Books

Foster, R.F. W.B. Yeats: A Life. Vol I and II Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Pierce, David. Yeats's Worlds: Ireland, England and the Poetic Imagination. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995.


Websites

Nobel Prize- Yeats Bio

Yeats Recording on Poetry

Yeats Society- Ireland

Abbey Theatre History

Yeats Society of New York


Sean O’Casey

Descriptor

Irish playwright whose focus on the Irish working class was unprecedented and revolutionary.


Books

Krause, David. Sean O'Casey: The Man and His Work. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1960.

O'Conner, Garry. Sean O'Casey: A Life. New York: Antheum/Macmillan Publishing Company, 1988.


Websites

O'Casey Bio

Literary Collection

Playography

Abbey Theatre History


Easter Rebellion

Descriptor

The day after Easter 1916 a small group of rebels decided they were done with British rule over Ireland. Attacks on a Post Office and other city buildings led to the deaths of many and the destruction of much of Dublin. Deemed a failure, the Easter Rebellion of 1916 marked the beginning of the end of British rule in Ireland.


Books

Foy, Michael, Brian Barton. The Easter Rising. Gloucestershire: Sutton Publishing Limited, 1999.

De Rosa, Peter. Rebels: The Irish Rising of 1916. London: Corgi Books, 1991.


Websites

BBC- Easter Rising

Conflict & Politics in Northern Ireland

The Easter Rising

National Library of Ireland


Winston Churchill

Descriptor

First Lord of the Admiralty during WWI. Best known for being Prime Minister of Great Britain during WWII.


Books

Lukacs, John. Churchill: Visionary, Statesman, Historian. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999.

Rubin, Gretchen. Forty Ways to Look at Winston Churchill: A Brief Account of a Long Life. New York: The Random House Ballantine Book Publishing Group, 2003.


Websites

BBC- Churchill Bio

The Churchill Centre

Churchill and the Great Republic

Time 100- Churchill

Nobel Prize- Churchill Bio

The Churchill Society- London


The Pankhursts

Descriptor

Mother and daughter team who led the suffrage movement in England. Best known for staging rallies, marches, and taking militant action to promote their cause.


Books

Mitchell, David. The Fighting Pankhurst. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1967.

Pankhurst, E. Sylvia. The Home Front. London: The Cresset Library, 1987.


Websites

BBC- Emmeline Pankhurst Bio

Sylvia Pankhurst Bio

Sylvia Pankhurst Papers

BBC- Suffragettes

Suffrage- Women's Epic Fight

Victorian Women

Life of the Victorian Woman


Women's Suffrage

Descriptor

Social movement in Britain and the US that sought to grant women the right to vote. Many women rallied, protested, and marched to fight for their rights, but some women sacrificed it all in the fight for equality. Despite all the earlier efforts made by women, it was their services in WWI that revealed the true social value of women.


Books

Briggs, Asa. A Social History of England. New York: The Vicking Press, 1984.

Keyssar, Alexander. The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States. New York: Basic Books, 2000.


Websites

Spartacus- American Woman Suffrage Association

LOC- American Women's Suffrage Collection

American Women's Suffrage Timeline

National Archives & Women's Suffrage

Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony

LOC- Suffrage Photos

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Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements Love's Sweet Song.


1916 Easter Rising: The Poets' Rebellion


Easter, 1916: At noon, Dublin explodes in gunfire as a motley band of Irish rebels takes on the world's most powerful empire. They begin by hijacking a post office. Despite a fierce spirit of independence, the disorganized rebellion failed to capture the heart of the people, who branded it as a reckless, humiliating act of deplorable violence. But in the aftermath of the Rising, the British response to the captured rebels would cement their roles as martyrs and institutionalize the use of violence for political change in Ireland for the remainder of the century. Produced and Written by Karena O'Riordan.

Running Time: (0:25:54)


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The Passions of William Butler Yeats


Up until the early 20th century, contemporary Irish literature barely existed in the world's imagination. Everyone looked to England for great literature. One man changed all that: William Butler Yeats set out to revive Irish literature. Countering the clichés and caricature that was the outward face of Irish culture to the uninitiated, Yeats' poetry and plays drew upon Celtic mythology and unleashed a distinctive Irish voice. The motivations driving this creative force were manifold, but unrequited love was central to Yeats' contributions. Produced and Written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:27:43)

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Sean O'Casey vs. Ireland


As Ireland struggled for Independence, writer Sean O'Casey watched the needs of the poor become increasingly overlooked as matters of flag and nation took center-stage. O'Casey bristled at the hypocrisy of pompous speeches, and the jingoistic glory that accompanied fervent nationalism. He questioned what was sacred in Ireland: the words of the priests and the words of the patriots. He questioned these pillars not through editorial or ideology, but by crafting real, human characters that represent such ideas in plays that were embraced by his countrymen. Produced and Written by Karena O'Riordan.

Running Time: (0:25:18)

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Ireland: The Power of the Poets


Poetry is powerful in Ireland. This harsh land, besieged by violence, poverty and strife has produced some of the world's most enduring lyric poets. Since ancient times, Ireland's poets have wielded great power, from the noble bards that accompanied the chieftains to the modern era, where the insight and commentary provided by poets have helped forge social change in the country. This documentary features Irish poets Eavan Boland, Paul Muldoon and Seamus Heaney. Produced and Written by Betsey Bayha.

Running Time: (0:26:53)


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Winston Churchill: The Lion's Roar


Brilliant, arrogant and energetic, Winston Churchill led the nation he loved throughout World War II when Britain's very existence was threatened. In the early 1930s, Churchill was an out-of-power politician who many viewed as past his prime, but he saw the threat that Hitler posed to the world. When his prophetic concerns proved true, Churchill became Prime Minister, and his eventful life to that point had well prepared him for the struggle that lay ahead. Produced and Written by Sharon Wood.

Running Time: (0:33:47)

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Demanding the Vote: The Pankhursts and British Suffrage


In 1913, the British government was under assault by its own people who were torching buildings, shattering office windows, and attacking the homes of government leaders. These revolutionaries were frustrated British women furious that their government refused to take them seriously. Their goal was simple: suffrage, the right to vote. But in Victorian England, their request was dismissed as too outrageous to be taken seriously. The press labeled these militant women "suffragettes," and they were led by the fiery Emmeline Pankhurst and her two strong-willed daughters Christabel and Sylvia. The Pankhursts helped alter the political landscape and the perception of women, but in the process, each of them paid a heavy personal price. Produced by Adam Sternberg. Written by Adam Sternberg and Lisa Clark.

Running Time: (0:27:07)

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Fighting for the Vote: Women's Suffrage in America


At the birth of the United States, the Declaration of Independence affirmed the principles and intentions of the country's founders. But when the nation was born, the principles applied almost exclusively to taxpaying property-owning white men. Only they were guaranteed suffrage: the right to vote. The majority of the population could not participate in the government, but that would change. The struggle for women's suffrage in the United States was nothing less than a social revolution. It challenged the established roles of men and women and held the government accountable to the principles on which the country had been founded: liberty and equality for all. Yet few Americans are aware of the effort that the struggle for women's suffrage entailed. Produced and Written by Adam Sternberg and Lisa Clark.

Running Time: (0:31:29)

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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: Love’s Sweet Song

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in Love’s Sweet Song.


Rollback of Women's Rights: Not Just in Afghanistan

Nationalgeographic.com
2/20/2014

An Afghan law that protects perpetrators of domestic violence, new sharia criminal laws in Brunei that allow stoning, sexual assaults in Arab Spring countries, and proposed "virginity tests" in Indonesia. These are just a few examples of a rollback of women's rights in recent years, even where revolutions and political transitions have been hailed in the West. Soon after it arrived on his desk, President Hamid Karzai sent Afghanistan's controversial new domestic violence law back to parliament, demanding changes.


World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

bbc.com
2/11/2014

No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most. It alone had power to halt the descent to disaster at any time in July 1914 by withdrawing its "blank cheque" which offered support to Austria for its invasion of Serbia. I'm afraid I am unconvinced by the argument that Serbia was a rogue state which deserved its nemesis at Austria's hands. And I do not believe Russia wanted a European war in 1914 - its leaders knew that it would have been in a far stronger position to fight two years later, having completed its rearmament programme.


Document Deep Dive: A Historic Moment in the Fight for Women’s Voting Rights

Smithsonian.com
3/1/2013

In the spring of 1913, women in six states had the right to vote in all elections: Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Washington and California. Despite these successes, though, the momentum of the 65-year-old suffrage movement was slowing. It was like a car running on fumes. Alice Paul decided to give it some gas. Having recently returned to the States from England, where she cut her teeth as a suffragist, the 28-year-old New Jersey native pitched an idea to the National American Woman Suffrage Association. She would organize a suffrage parade in Washington, D.C., strategically timed with the influx of crowds arriving for President Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration, to drum up support for the cause. NAWSA appointed Paul the chair of its Congressional committee and approved her plan, but made it clear that she would have to come up with the money for the parade on her own.


Drinking Tea Was Once Considered an Irresponsible, Reckless Pursuit for Women

Smithsonian.com
12/5/2012

Poor Irish women who drank tea in the 19th century might as well have been chugging a bottle of whiskey. Critics viewed the provocative kettle as stifling to their country’s economic growth and the tea-chugging habit as reckless and uncontrollable. Tea was a waste of time and money, luring working girls away from their never ending husband and home-tending duties.


Daughters of Wealth, Sisters in Revolt

Smithsonian.com
7/10/2012

At the end of the 19thcentury, William Butler Yeats was a given a bedroom at Lissadell House, the majestic estate of Sir Henry Gore-Booth on the shores of Drumcliff Bay, not far from Yeats’ birthplace in Sligo County. For two years, Yeats stayed in the house amid the enchanted landscape of Ireland’s West Coast, the guest of a “very pleasant, kindly, inflammable family.” But it was clear that Yeats, who was entering his 30s, was also enchanted by the beauty of the Gore-Booth sisters, Constance and Eva. Decades later he would write: The light of evening, Lissadell, Great windows open to the south, Two girls in silk kimonos, both Beautiful, one a gazelle.


Five Women Animators Who Shook Up the Industry

Smithsonian.com
6/13/2012

Pixar’s new release Brave is being singled out for, among other things, having the studio’s first female lead character. For years writers have been criticizing Pixar and its parent company Walt Disney for holding onto outdated gender attitudes: helpless princesses, evil witches, etc. After Disney’s 2009 feature The Princess and the Frog underperformed at the box office, the company renamed its “Rapunzel” feature to Tangled in an attempt to attract a wider (read: “male”) audience.


Holiday Delivery From the Graf Zeppelin

Smithsonian.com
12/1/2010

On December 8, 1934, the dirigible Graf Zeppelin - named for one inventor of hydrogen airships, Graf (Count) Ferdinand von Zeppelin - departed its Friedrichshafen, Germany, home base on its 418th flight, bound for Recife, Brazil. At the height of the Christmas season, the 776-foot-long dirigible carried 19 passengers, holiday mail and a load of freshly cut Christmas trees.


In Northern Ireland, Getting Past the Troubles

Smithsonian.com
3/20/2009

The crime that still haunts Don Browne took place on a cold, damp evening in February 1985 outside a housing development in a working-class neighborhood of Derry, Northern Ireland. That night, Browne says, he handed over a cache of weapons to fellow members of a Catholic paramilitary unit. The gunmen whom he had supplied pulled up to a row house where Douglas McElhinney, 42, a former officer in the Ulster Defense Regiment "the Northern Ireland branch of the British Army" was visiting a friend. As McElhinney was about to drive away, a member of the hit squad killed him with a sawed-off shotgun.


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


Spring Break Adventure | Love's Sweet Song | Trenches of Hell
Young Indy Home