Chapter Eighteen: Treasure of the Peacock's Eye

Masks of Evil | Treasure of the Peacock's Eye | Winds of Change
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Chapter Overview

As World War I winds down, Indy teams up with his old friend Remy to track down a saboteur in the trenches. When the traitor is finally discovered, his dying words and a map send Indy and Remy around the world to find the Treasure of the Peacock’s Eye. Along the way Indy meets up with his old friend Howard Carter who is travelling with E.M. Forster. Following a dangerous trail that leads them from London to Alexandria and finally to the South China Seas, Indy finds himself making a life altering decision that will eventually lead him back home to America. One-eyed Germans, headhunting natives, and Chinese pirates make this exciting quest a foreshadowing of the Indiana Jones that will mature into the whip-cracking adventurer that we all love.

Key Topics:

Alexander the Great; Bronislaw Malinowski; Anthropology

Historic People:

Bronislaw Malinowski—Famed Anthropologist who studied in Papua New Guinea & the Trobriand Islands.
Howard Carter—Archaeologist who discovered the tomb of King Tutankhamun
E.M. Forster—British writer of such novels as A Passage to India & Howards End

People and Topics


Bronislaw Malinowski

Descriptor

Famed Anthropologist who studied in Papua New Guinea & the Trobriand Islands.


Books

Malinowski, Bronislaw. A Diary in the Strict Sense of the Term. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc., 1967.

Young, Michael W. Malinowski: Odyssey of an Anthropologist. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2004.


Websites

Malinowski Papers

Vanderbilt- Malinowski Information

Yale- Malinowski Papers

Trobriand Islands


Anthropology

Descriptor

Is quite simply defined as the study of humanity. Anthropology examines culture, how and why people behave the way they do, how people interact, etc. Anthropologists are known for immersing themselves in a culture by "moving in" with the group being studied.


Books

Erikson, Thomas Hylland, Finn Sivert Nielsen. A History of Anthropology. London: Pluto Press, 2001.

Erikson, Thomas Hylland. What is Anthropology. London: Pluto Press, 2004.


Websites

American Anthropological Association

Smithsonian Department of Anthropology

National Anthropological Archive

Association of Social Anthropologists UK


Howard Carter

Descriptor

Archaeologist who discovered the tomb of King Tutankhamun and ushered in a new era of archaeology with his dedication to conservation and study of finds.


Books

Reeves, Nicholas, John H. Taylor. Howard Carter Before Tutankhamun. New York: Harry M. Abrams, 1992.

Hoving, Thomas. Tutankhamun: The Untold Story. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978.


Websites

Howard Carter

BBC-History-Ancient Egypt

At the Tomb of Tut

The British Museum- Ancient Egypt

Egyptology Resources

Ancient Egypt Research Associates


E.M. Forster

Descriptor

British writer of such novels as A Passage to India & Howards End.


Books

Forster, E.M. A Passage to India. Penguin Books Ltd., 2000.

Furbank, P.N. E.M. Forster: A Life. Harvest Books, 1994.


Websites

Forster Collection & Bio

Unofficial Site of Forster

Aspects of Forster

Comprehensive Site on Forster

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Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements Treasure of the Peacock's Eye.


Bronislaw Malinowski: God Professor


In 1915, a Polish scholar named Bronislaw Malinowski landed on a tiny island off the coast of New Guinea. He had come as an anthropologist -- a scientist who studies the origins and behavior of human kind. He had come to investigate the lifestyle, customs and beliefs of the people who lived there. The methods he would develop to conduct his investigation would change anthropology forever. Produced by Mark Page and Jennifer Petrucelli; Written by Mark Page.

Running Time: (0:29:34)

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Anthropology: Looking at the Human Condition


For over 100 years anthropologists have been learning from people in every corner of our world, and using the data they gather to create a group portrait of the human race. And wherever they find their subjects -- whether they live on the other side of the globe or just down the block, hang out in a tropical rainforest, a corporate boardroom or a parking lot, anthropologists help us to understand our fellow human beings, and our selves. Produced by Mark Page and Jennifer Petrucelli; Written by Mark Page.

Running Time: (0:23:48)

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New Guinea: Paradise in Peril


A land of mystery and danger, it's been said that New Guinea contains more strange and new and beautiful things than any other part of the globe. Located off the coast of southeast Asia just North of Australia, this rugged and vast tropical island was one of the last places on Earth to be explored by white men. Tantalizing glimpses of the fierce people who lived in New Guinea as well as the island's stunning plant and animal life have long lured Western adventurers looking to make new discoveries. They were not disappointed. Produced and Written by Betsy Bayha.

Running Time: (0:25:04)


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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: Treasure of the Peacock's Eye

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in Treasure of the Peacock's Eye.


For men used to mining - fighting in trenches was seen as an escape FROM HELL

express.co.uk
6/1/2014

These days, however, Big Pit digs tourism, not coal; the party descending into the earth are American visitors. There are no working deep-mines remaining in South Wales; already in decline, the area's coalfield was annihilated in the wake of the 1984-5 Miners' Strike, the names of the closed collieries to toll like funeral bells. Mardy. Tower. Deep Navigation. Markham. Lady Windsor. How black was my valley a century ago, on the eve of the Great War, when there were a dozen collieries within sight, and another 600 coal mines across South Wales, employing 232,000 men, who hewed 57 million tons a year, a fifth of the entire output of the United Kingdom. The very earth vibrated to the metronomic percussion of thousands of subterranean men wielding the pick. Coal for the Navy. Coal for industry. Coal for locomotives. Coal for homes.


Help Transcribe Diaries From World War I

Smithsonian.com
3/18/2014

The National Archives currently has in its collection 1.5 million pages of handwritten diaries kept by soldiers of World War I. They're some of the most requested documents in the National Archives reading room, but until now have been accessible only to anyone who's made the trip to D.C. But now the archivisits are working to put them online, and you can help them. The project is called Operation War Diary, and it comes from a partnership between the National Archives, the citizen science initiative Zooniverse and the Imperial War Museum in the UK. The diaries have all been scanned and posted online for citizen historians to look at and transcribe. According to the project: "The war diaries contain a wealth of information of far greater interest than the army could ever have predicted. They provide unrivalled insight into daily events on the front line, and are full of fascinating detail about the decisions that were made and the activities that resulted from them."


World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

bbc.com
2/11/2014

No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most. It alone had power to halt the descent to disaster at any time in July 1914 by withdrawing its "blank cheque" which offered support to Austria for its invasion of Serbia. I'm afraid I am unconvinced by the argument that Serbia was a rogue state which deserved its nemesis at Austria's hands. And I do not believe Russia wanted a European war in 1914 - its leaders knew that it would have been in a far stronger position to fight two years later, having completed its rearmament programme.


World War One: The circus animals that helped Britain

bbc.com
11/10/2013

On the cobbled streets of industrial Sheffield an Indian elephant dutifully lumbered along. Her task was important - she had to cart munitions, machines and scrap metal around the city, a job previously done by three horses taken off to war. Lizzie - as she was known - was used to performing tricks as part of a travelling menagerie. But with the outbreak of World War One she was conscripted to help with heavy labour, fitted with a harness and sent to work at a scrap metal merchants.


First Unlooted Royal Tomb of Its Kind Unearthed in Peru

Nationalgeographic.com
6/27/2013

It was a stunning discovery: the first unlooted imperial tomb of the Wari, the ancient civilization that built South America's earliest empire between 700 and 1000 A.D. Yet it wasn't happiness that Milosz Giersz felt when he first glimpsed gold in the dim recesses of the burial chamber in northern Peru. Giersz, an archaeologist at the University of Warsaw in Poland, realized at once that if word leaked out that his Polish-Peruvian team had discovered a 1,200-year-old "temple of the dead" filled with precious gold and silver artifacts, looters would descend on the site in droves. "I had a nightmare about the possibility," says Giersz.


Starving Settlers in Jamestown Colony Resorted to Cannibalism

Smithsonian.com
5/1/2013

The harsh winter of 1609 in Virginia’s Jamestown Colony forced residents to do the unthinkable. A recent excavation at the historic site discovered the carcasses of dogs, cats and horses consumed during the season commonly called the “Starving Time.” But a few other newly discovered bones in particular, though, tell a far more gruesome story: the dismemberment and cannibalization of a 14-year-old English girl.


Rare World War I Images Found Inside Antique Camera By Photographer Anton Orlov

huffingtonpost.com
1/11/2013

A blogger passionate about historic photography techniques serendipitously found some old photos inside his newly-purchased camera. As in, World War I old. Last week, Anton Orlov of the Photo Palace blog was cleaning the Jumelle Belllieni stereoscopic camera that he'd bought at an antique store a few days prior, and found the images completely by accident. According to his blog, he opened the film chamber and saw the negatives on a stack of glass plates.


Mysterious Maya Tomb Explored for First Time

Nationalgeographic.com
11/30/2012

An entrance to a Maya burial chamber is decorated with vibrant red wall murals—the first look scientists have gotten of a mysterious tomb discovered in 1999. For the first time, a team of researchers from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) recently entered the tomb, which also contains 11 vessels as well as pieces of jade, according to an INAH statement.


Why the Maya Fell: Climate Change, Conflict—And a Trip to the Beach?

Nationalgeographic.com
11/9/2012

Every civilization has its rise and fall. But no culture has fallen quite like the Maya Empire, seemingly swallowed by the jungle after centuries of urban, cultural, intellectual, and agricultural evolution. What went wrong? The latest discoveries point not to a cataclysmic eruption, quake, or plague but rather to climate change. And faced with the fallout, one expert says, the Maya may have packed up and gone to the beach.


Mysterious Maya Calendar & Mural Uncovered

Nationalgeographic.com
5/10/2012

Researchers have uncovered a remarkably well-preserved Maya mural and calendar markings that add perspective on Maya thinking. National Geographic Society grantee William Saturno and his team uncovered the artwork in what was either a home or workplace abandoned hundreds of years ago. The findings are published in the May 11 issue of the journal Science and the June edition of National Geographic magazine.


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


Masks of Evil | Treasure of the Peacock's Eye | Winds of Change
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