Chapter One: My First Adventure

My First Adventure | Passion for Life
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Chapter Overview

From the ancient pyramids of Egypt to the exotic bazaars of Morocco, Indiana Jones finds excitement, danger and adventure at every turn. While on an archaeological dig in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, Indy uncovers an ancient mummy and a fresh corpse. With the help of T.E. Lawrence, the legendary Lawrence of Arabia, Indy solves an intriguing murder mystery only to find himself thrust right back into danger when he is kidnapped by slave-trading brigands. Dragged on a terrifying journey across the burning sands of North Africa to the slave markets of Marrakesh, Indy finds that he must rely on his courage and wits to survive the brutal ordeal

Key Topics:

Howard Carter’s work in the Valley of the Kings; slave markets of Marrakesh

Historic People:

T.E. Lawrence-- (Lawrence of Arabia) scholar, archaeologist, diplomat and British military hero
Howard Carter-- British archaeologist who discovered the tomb of King Tut

People and Topics


Archaeology & Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb

Descriptor

One of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time. Revealed much about Ancient Egyptian culture and led to a revival of interest in Ancient Egypt.


Books

Carter, Howard. The Tomb of Tutankhamen. Great Britain: Excalibur Books, 1954.

Hoving, Thomas. Tutankhamun: The Untold Story. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978.

Burton, Harry. Wonderful Things: The Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1976.


Websites

BBC-History-Archaeology

Excavation Techniques

Center for Archaeological Research

Archaeological Institute of America

Archaeology Magazine

King Tut: Tomb Discovery

Discovery Channel- Assassination of Tut


Howard Carter

Descriptor

British archaeologist who discovered the tomb of King Tut and ushered in a new era of archaeology with his dedication to conservation and study of finds.


Books

Reeves, Nicholas, John H. Taylor. Howard Carter Before Tutankhamun. New York: Harry M. Abrams, 1992.

Hoving, Thomas. Tutankhamun: The Untold Story. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978.


Websites

Howard Carter

BBC-History-Ancient Egypt

At the Tomb of Tut

The British Museum- Ancient Egypt

Egyptology Resources

Ancient Egypt Research Associates


T.E. Lawrence

Descriptor

Scholar, archaeologist, diplomat and British military hero whose famous exploits forever made him Lawrence of Arabia. Beginning in 1911, Lawrence studied Arabic and archaeology in the Middle East. When war broke out, his knowledge of Arabic and Middle Eastern geography made him an invaluable part of the British Army. The relationships he forged earlier allowed him to serve as a trusted diplomat to Arabs during and after the war.


Books

Lawrence, T.E. Seven Pillars of Wisdom: A Triumph. London: Jonathan Cape Publishers, 1936.

Wilson, Jeremy. Lawrence of Arabia, The Authorised Biography. London: Heinemann, 1989.


Websites

The T.E. Lawrence Society

T.E. Lawrence Bio

T.E. Lawrence Studies

T.E. Lawrence Papers


Slavery

Descriptor

Slavery exists when a person's individual freedoms are denied and they are forced to labor with no compensation. Slavery has existed throughout the world since before recorded history and even though it is currently outlawed in most countries, slavery remains a popular labor source in many parts of the world. African slaves, the resulting slave trade, and antebellum plantations are typically what most Westerners think of when it comes to slavery. However, it is important to remember that slavery existed in Africa long before the Atlantic Slave Trade. Examples of early African slavery include: Ancient Romans enslaving Carthaginians, African tribes enslaving each other, and Muslims enslaving Africans and selling them across Asia.


Books

Everest, Suzanne. History of Slavery. Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell House, 1996.

Bales, Kevin. Disposable People. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.


Websites

The Atlantic Slave Trade

Slavery in Ancient Rome

BBC- Modern Slavery

21st Century Slavery


Ancient Egypt

Descriptor

Ancient Egypt was a civilization that flourished in the Nile Region of North Africa between 3,000 B.C. and 31 B.C. Much like the Romans, the Ancient Egyptians developed a complex society that still fascinates us today. Whether it's mummification, pyramids, hieroglyphics, architecture, or medicine, the Ancient Egyptians left behind a legacy that historians and archaeologists will continue to marvel over for centuries to come.


Books

Lehner, Mark. The Complete Pyramids. London: Thames & Hudson, 1997.

Bard, KA. Encyclopedia of the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt. NY, NY: Routledge, 1999.


Websites

BBC-History-Ancient Egypt

Center for Archaeological Research

The British Museum- Ancient Egypt

Egyptology Resources

Ancient Egypt Research Associates

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Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements My First Adventure.


Archaeology: Unearthing Our Past


Man's history on Earth dates back at least tens of thousands of years, yet written records stretch back to only a fraction of that. Helping clarify the picture of humanity past is the science of archaeology. Though the cinematic escapades of Indiana Jones describe a world of globe-trotting adventure, in truth archaeologists are more like detectives, piecing together clues to mysteries of what has come before. Produced and written by Adam Sternberg..

Running Time: (0:19:17)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
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Howard Carter and the Tomb of Tutankhamun


Howard Carter's unflagging persistence and stubbornness led to one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century: the tomb of King Tut. Yet it was that same strong-headedness that would time and again jeopardize Carter's career. Learn more about the man and his discovery which propelled Egyptology into the pop culture landscape. Produced and written by Adam Sternberg..

Running Time: (0:22:34)

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Colonel Lawrence's War: T.E. Lawrence and Arabia


He was an action hero as well as an intellectual hero. T.E. Lawrence escaped a safe office job during World War I to become a guerilla war mastermind in desert combat, fighting alongside Arabs to throw off the rule of the Ottoman Empire. But despite British promises of Arab independence, the Middle East would end up being carved by European colonial treaties, and Lawrence faced the challenges of keeping his word to his trusted compatriots of the desert. Produced and written by Sharon Wood..

Running Time: (0:36:05)

This documentary is also available with the bonus features for Chapter 15: Daredevil's of the Desert



From Slavery to Freedom


Humanity has lived in, with and on the profits of slavery for most of its history. Many of its greatest achievements and monuments have tragically been built on the backs of slave labor. How could people place their economic needs ahead of the humanity of their fellow beings? How could this horrific system have lasted for so long? In this documentary track the history of slavery from Ancient Greece, to the Crusades, to the colonization of the new world and the racial slavery that sparked the American Civil War. The journey from slavery to freedom is incomplete and continues as there are still over 20 million people enslaved today. Produced and written by Mark Page. .

Running Time: (0:30:08)

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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: My First Adventure

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in My First Adventure.


For the First Time Ever, Explore Angkor Wat With Google Street View

Smithsonian.com
4/3/2014

Angkor, what remains of the capital of the Khmer Empire, is an incredibly beautiful place, but it's also very remote: tucked in the Cambodian jungle, at the intersection of jumbled ancient roads, its ruins remain off the beaten path and seemingly untouched by the modern world. Or at least it remained untouched until the 2000s, when the Cambodian government granted the oil company Sokimex rights to the money earned from ticket concessions to Angkor, and tourism to the ancient ruins skyrocketed—today, nearly two million visitors traipse over the temples' stones, causing irreversible damage to the site's foundations. Like Machu Picchu, once hidden from human view and then endangered by an influx of tourism, Angkor could eventually fall into complete ruin because of its appeal.


Ancient Migration Patterns to North America Are Hidden in Languages Spoken Today

Smithsonian.com
3/12/2014

A few weeks ago, scientists announced an intriguing finding about the ancestors of today's Native Americans. Previously, genetic analysis had indicated that they'd left Siberia to migrate across ancient Beringia (the strip of land that once connected Asia and what's now Alaska) about 25,000 years ago, but the earliest evidence of human habitation on North America dates to 15,000 years ago.


How the Monuments Men Saved Italy’s Treasures

Smithsonian.com
1/15/2014

Swam through the sea a crescent of sunwashed white houses, lavender hillsides and rust red roofs, and a high campanile whose bells, soft across the water, stole to the mental ear. No country in the world has, for me, the breathtaking beauty of Italy.” It was the fall of 1943. A couple of months earlier, the Sicilian landings of July 10 had marked the beginning of the Allied Italian campaign. The two British officers, who had met and become instant friends during the recently concluded push to drive the Germans from North Africa, were assigned to the Allied Military Government for Occupied Territories (AMGOT), which took over control of Italy as the country was being liberated by the Allies. Edward “Teddy” Croft-Murray, who in civilian life was a curator of prints and drawings at the British Museum in London, belonged to the small Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) unit inside AMGOT. Its task—dramatized in George Clooney’s new film, The Monuments Men, celebrating the unit’s exploits—would be to safeguard landmarks and works of art from war damage. Croft-Murray had, Fielden wrote in his memoirs, a “twinkling eye in a large face which was attached to the most untidy imaginable body...the Ancient Monument he called himself. God be praised, I said, for someone like this.”


Fossil Tooth Is "Smoking Gun" That T. Rex Was a Killer

Nationalgeographic.com
7/17/2013

A fossil tooth found buried inside the healed tailbones of a duckbill dinosaur suggests the animal survived a close encounter with a Tyrannosaurus rex about 65 million years ago, according to a new study. Scientists say the embedded tooth, discovered in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, is the first conclusive proof that T. rex was not just a scavenger, but also a predator that hunted and killed prey. (Related: "Scarred Duckbill Dinosaur Escaped T. Rex Attack.") "It's not just a smoking gun—we've actually found the bullet," said study co-author Peter Larson, a paleontologist at the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in South Dakota.


First Unlooted Royal Tomb of Its Kind Unearthed in Peru

Nationalgeographic.com
6/27/2013

It was a stunning discovery: the first unlooted imperial tomb of the Wari, the ancient civilization that built South America's earliest empire between 700 and 1000 A.D. Yet it wasn't happiness that Milosz Giersz felt when he first glimpsed gold in the dim recesses of the burial chamber in northern Peru. Giersz, an archaeologist at the University of Warsaw in Poland, realized at once that if word leaked out that his Polish-Peruvian team had discovered a 1,200-year-old "temple of the dead" filled with precious gold and silver artifacts, looters would descend on the site in droves. "I had a nightmare about the possibility," says Giersz.


Dead Sea Scroll For Sale; Fragments Of Earliest Bible Ever Found Offered To Highest Bidder

huffingtonpost.com
5/25/2013

Parts of the Dead Sea Scrolls are up for sale – in tiny pieces. Nearly 70 years after the discovery of the world's oldest biblical manuscripts, the Palestinian family who originally sold them to scholars and institutions is now quietly marketing the leftovers – fragments the family says it has kept in a Swiss safe deposit box all these years.


Potato Famine Pathogen's DNA Sequenced, Solving Scientific Mystery After 168 Years

huffingtonpost.com
5/23/2013

More than 1 million people died of starvation and disease during the Irish Potato Famine (also known as the Great Famine), between 1845 and 1852—a watershed event for the Irish that caused 1 million people to emigrate and fueled tension between Irish Catholics and Protestants in England who offered little aid. All the suffering was triggered by the blight that wiped out a single species of potato—the so-called Irish "lumper"—that the Irish depended on as a staple crop to feed their growing population.


Ancient Maya Pyramid Destroyed in Belize

Nationalgeographic.com
5/15/2013

Despite its small size, the Caribbean country of Belize is known for a few outstanding characteristics: a spectacular barrier reef, a teeming rain forest, and extensive Maya ruins. It now has one fewer of those ruins. A construction company in Belize has been scooping stone out of the major pyramid at the site of Nohmul (meaning Big Mound), one of only 15 ancient Maya sites important enough to be noted on the National Geographic World Atlas.


Starving Settlers in Jamestown Colony Resorted to Cannibalism

Smithsonian.com
5/1/2013

The harsh winter of 1609 in Virginia’s Jamestown Colony forced residents to do the unthinkable. A recent excavation at the historic site discovered the carcasses of dogs, cats and horses consumed during the season commonly called the “Starving Time.” But a few other newly discovered bones in particular, though, tell a far more gruesome story: the dismemberment and cannibalization of a 14-year-old English girl.


8 Mummy Finds Revealing Ancient Disease

Nationalgeographic.com
3/21/2013

Whether laid to rest in a simple grave or a grand tomb, the human body rarely survives the sweep of time. But in a few places where people deliberately mummified their dead, or the environmental conditions were right—very dry or wet—flesh and bone are preserved. Today these remains, probed by modern CT scans, MRIs, and DNA tests, are offering intriguing insights into how people lived and died long ago. A 2011 study of 52 mummies in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo showed that almost half had clogged arteries, the kind of condition that can lead to a heart attack or stroke.


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


My First Adventure | Passion for Life
Young Indy Home