Chapter One: My First Adventure

My First Adventure | Passion for Life
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Chapter Overview

From the ancient pyramids of Egypt to the exotic bazaars of Morocco, Indiana Jones finds excitement, danger and adventure at every turn. While on an archaeological dig in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, Indy uncovers an ancient mummy and a fresh corpse. With the help of T.E. Lawrence, the legendary Lawrence of Arabia, Indy solves an intriguing murder mystery only to find himself thrust right back into danger when he is kidnapped by slave-trading brigands. Dragged on a terrifying journey across the burning sands of North Africa to the slave markets of Marrakesh, Indy finds that he must rely on his courage and wits to survive the brutal ordeal

Key Topics:

Howard Carter’s work in the Valley of the Kings; slave markets of Marrakesh

Historic People:

T.E. Lawrence-- (Lawrence of Arabia) scholar, archaeologist, diplomat and British military hero
Howard Carter-- British archaeologist who discovered the tomb of King Tut

People and Topics


Archaeology & Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb

Descriptor

One of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time. Revealed much about Ancient Egyptian culture and led to a revival of interest in Ancient Egypt.


Books

Carter, Howard. The Tomb of Tutankhamen. Great Britain: Excalibur Books, 1954.

Hoving, Thomas. Tutankhamun: The Untold Story. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978.

Burton, Harry. Wonderful Things: The Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1976.


Websites

BBC-History-Archaeology

Excavation Techniques

Center for Archaeological Research

Archaeological Institute of America

Archaeology Magazine

King Tut: Tomb Discovery

Discovery Channel- Assassination of Tut


Howard Carter

Descriptor

British archaeologist who discovered the tomb of King Tut and ushered in a new era of archaeology with his dedication to conservation and study of finds.


Books

Reeves, Nicholas, John H. Taylor. Howard Carter Before Tutankhamun. New York: Harry M. Abrams, 1992.

Hoving, Thomas. Tutankhamun: The Untold Story. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978.


Websites

Howard Carter

BBC-History-Ancient Egypt

At the Tomb of Tut

The British Museum- Ancient Egypt

Egyptology Resources

Ancient Egypt Research Associates


T.E. Lawrence

Descriptor

Scholar, archaeologist, diplomat and British military hero whose famous exploits forever made him Lawrence of Arabia. Beginning in 1911, Lawrence studied Arabic and archaeology in the Middle East. When war broke out, his knowledge of Arabic and Middle Eastern geography made him an invaluable part of the British Army. The relationships he forged earlier allowed him to serve as a trusted diplomat to Arabs during and after the war.


Books

Lawrence, T.E. Seven Pillars of Wisdom: A Triumph. London: Jonathan Cape Publishers, 1936.

Wilson, Jeremy. Lawrence of Arabia, The Authorised Biography. London: Heinemann, 1989.


Websites

The T.E. Lawrence Society

T.E. Lawrence Bio

T.E. Lawrence Studies

T.E. Lawrence Papers


Slavery

Descriptor

Slavery exists when a person's individual freedoms are denied and they are forced to labor with no compensation. Slavery has existed throughout the world since before recorded history and even though it is currently outlawed in most countries, slavery remains a popular labor source in many parts of the world. African slaves, the resulting slave trade, and antebellum plantations are typically what most Westerners think of when it comes to slavery. However, it is important to remember that slavery existed in Africa long before the Atlantic Slave Trade. Examples of early African slavery include: Ancient Romans enslaving Carthaginians, African tribes enslaving each other, and Muslims enslaving Africans and selling them across Asia.


Books

Everest, Suzanne. History of Slavery. Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell House, 1996.

Bales, Kevin. Disposable People. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.


Websites

The Atlantic Slave Trade

Slavery in Ancient Rome

BBC- Modern Slavery

21st Century Slavery


Ancient Egypt

Descriptor

Ancient Egypt was a civilization that flourished in the Nile Region of North Africa between 3,000 B.C. and 31 B.C. Much like the Romans, the Ancient Egyptians developed a complex society that still fascinates us today. Whether it's mummification, pyramids, hieroglyphics, architecture, or medicine, the Ancient Egyptians left behind a legacy that historians and archaeologists will continue to marvel over for centuries to come.


Books

Lehner, Mark. The Complete Pyramids. London: Thames & Hudson, 1997.

Bard, KA. Encyclopedia of the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt. NY, NY: Routledge, 1999.


Websites

BBC-History-Ancient Egypt

Center for Archaeological Research

The British Museum- Ancient Egypt

Egyptology Resources

Ancient Egypt Research Associates

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Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements My First Adventure.


Archaeology: Unearthing Our Past


Man's history on Earth dates back at least tens of thousands of years, yet written records stretch back to only a fraction of that. Helping clarify the picture of humanity past is the science of archaeology. Though the cinematic escapades of Indiana Jones describe a world of globe-trotting adventure, in truth archaeologists are more like detectives, piecing together clues to mysteries of what has come before. Produced and written by Adam Sternberg..

Running Time: (0:19:17)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
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Howard Carter and the Tomb of Tutankhamun


Howard Carter's unflagging persistence and stubbornness led to one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century: the tomb of King Tut. Yet it was that same strong-headedness that would time and again jeopardize Carter's career. Learn more about the man and his discovery which propelled Egyptology into the pop culture landscape. Produced and written by Adam Sternberg..

Running Time: (0:22:34)

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Colonel Lawrence's War: T.E. Lawrence and Arabia


He was an action hero as well as an intellectual hero. T.E. Lawrence escaped a safe office job during World War I to become a guerilla war mastermind in desert combat, fighting alongside Arabs to throw off the rule of the Ottoman Empire. But despite British promises of Arab independence, the Middle East would end up being carved by European colonial treaties, and Lawrence faced the challenges of keeping his word to his trusted compatriots of the desert. Produced and written by Sharon Wood..

Running Time: (0:36:05)

This documentary is also available with the bonus features for Chapter 15: Daredevil's of the Desert



From Slavery to Freedom


Humanity has lived in, with and on the profits of slavery for most of its history. Many of its greatest achievements and monuments have tragically been built on the backs of slave labor. How could people place their economic needs ahead of the humanity of their fellow beings? How could this horrific system have lasted for so long? In this documentary track the history of slavery from Ancient Greece, to the Crusades, to the colonization of the new world and the racial slavery that sparked the American Civil War. The journey from slavery to freedom is incomplete and continues as there are still over 20 million people enslaved today. Produced and written by Mark Page. .

Running Time: (0:30:08)

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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: My First Adventure

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in My First Adventure.


Only a Handful of People Can Enter the Chauvet Cave Each Year. Our Reporter Was One of Them.

Smithsonian.com
4/14/2015

The entry into the depths of the Chauvet Cave, the world’s greatest repository of Palaeolithic art, begins with a dramatic ascent. A steep switchback trail through a forest brings one to the foot of a limestone cliff. From here a wood-plank walkway leads to a steel door. Behind it, sealed from outsiders by four secure locks- including a biometric lock accessible by only four conservators - lies a time capsule that remained hidden from the world for 35,000 years.


Planned Afghan Cultural Center Will Honor Ancient Statues Destroyed by the Taliban

Smithsonian.com
4/6/2015

In March 2001, the Taliban destroyed two ancient, colossal Buddha statues that towered above Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Valley. The statues, carved about 1,500 years ago by monks and considered the largest of their kind in the world, were integral not only to Buddhism (one even contained relics from the Buddha himself) but also to local culture. “The statues symbolised Bamiyan,” Mullah Sayed Ahmed-Hussein Hanif told The Guardian, even though locals (now mostly Muslim) “had completely forgotten they were figures of the Buddha,” said Hamid Jalya, head of historical monuments in Bamiyan province, to the news outlet.


Finding This Lost City in Honduras Was the Easy Part

nytimes.com
3/20/2015

RIGHT now, in the jungle some 50 miles inland from the Mosquito Coast of Honduras, sits an astounding cache of ancient artifacts, until this month most likely unseen by human eyes for somewhere between 600 and 1,000 years. I traveled there three weeks ago with a team of archaeologists, anthropologists, ethnobotanists, filmmakers and Honduran soldiers, who were following up on lidar images — a laser-based aerial surveillance technology — that suggested the presence of ruins.


Oldest Human Fossil Unearthed in Ethiopia

Smithsonian.com
3/4/2015

One January morning in 2013, while climbing an eroded hill in Ethiopia’s Afar region, Calachew Seeyoum came across a broken tooth. The graduate student knew at once that it was a fossil, and it was important. The thick enamel was a surefire sign that the premolar had come from one of our extinct hominid relatives. Squatting in the silty soil, Seeyoum found more teeth and half a lower jaw that confirmed his first impression.


Spanish Conquest of the Incas Caused Air Pollution to Spike

Smithsonian.com
2/9/2015

The arrival of the Spanish in South America in the late 16th century heralded the destruction of the once mighty Inca empire—and triggered a surge in air pollution levels that was not exceeded until the 20th century.


Exploring the Titanic of the Ancient World

Smithsonian.com
2/1/2015

More than 4,500 miles from home, Brendan Foley climbs out of a battered Fiat van and heads for the edge of the cliff up ahead. The sharp rocks are dotted with goat droppings and gorse, and he struggles to keep his footing as the wind screams past, so violent that he wonders for a moment if he’ll be blown right off the rocks. From as close to the edge as he dares, he looks down at the waves. The gales have turned the sea so white it looks like boiling milk.


Ancient Scrolls Blackened by Vesuvius Are Readable at Last

Smithsonian.com
1/20/2015

The lavish villa sat overlooking the Bay of Naples, offering bright ocean views to the well-heeled Romans who came from across the empire to study. The estate's library was stocked with texts by prominent thinkers of the day, in particular a wealth of volumes by the philosopher Philodemus, an instructor of the poet Virgil.


World's Most Ambitious Re-Creation of Prehistoric Cave Art to Open

Nationalgeographic.com
12/19/2014

On a September afternoon in 2013, Gilles Tosello sat sipping a cup of American-style coffee in his Toulouse studio, pondering the talents of cave painters who lived in France 36,000 years ago. Tosello enjoyed a personal connection with those painters because he was the man the French Ministry of Culture and Communication had engaged to re-create their most famous works, some of the oldest, most beautiful, and best preserved cave art on Earth: the images in the Cave of Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc. Its legendary Panel of Horses includes exquisite charcoal horse heads, snarling lions, and battling wooly rhinoceroses drawn across 475 square feet of undulating rock. Even more famous is another tableau he was hired to re-create, the spectacular Lion Panel, 750 square feet of prowling lions, baby mammoths, and charging rhinos. Tosello sighed.


Behind Tomb Connected to Alexander the Great, Intrigue Worthy of "Game of Thrones"

Nationalgeographic.com
11/21/2014

Suspense is rising as archaeologists sift for clues to the identity of the person buried with pomp and circumstance in the mysterious Amphipolis tomb in what is now northern Greece. The research team thinks the tomb was built for someone very close to Alexander the Great—his mother, Olympias; one of his wives, Roxane; one of his favorite generals; or possibly his childhood friend and lover, Hephaestion.


Children’s Grave Offers Insight Into Earliest Americans

Nationalgeographic.com
11/10/2014

During the last ice age, two infants in what is now Alaska were laid to rest, precious hunting tools at their sides. Now, more than 11,000 years later, scientists announce the discovery of the tiny skeletons and their extraordinary burial spot—underneath the fire pit of an ancient house.


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


My First Adventure | Passion for Life
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