Chapter Fourteen: Espionage Escapades

Adventures in the Secret Service | Espionage Escapades | Daredevils of the Desert
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Chapter Overview

Indy once again finds himself undercover, but this time he’s posing as a dancer for the Ballets Russes in Spain. Charged with discrediting some German diplomats, Indy teams up with some fellow spies whose skills, as it turns out, are anything but adequate. Indy is then sent off to Prague where he is ordered to answer a specific phone at a specific place and time. Indy arrives to discover that there is no phone in the designated location. He then encounters the difficulties of dealing with bureaucracies and the never-ending paperwork as he attempts to get a phone installed. In the process of completing his mission, Indy enlists the aid of future writer, Franz Kafka.

Key Topics:

Espionage in World War I; Bureaucracies; Ballet

Historic People:

Pablo Picasso-- Spanish painter and creator of cubism.
Franz Kafka-- Controversial writer whose posthumously published works expressed his feelings on 20th Century man.

People and Topics


Pablo Picasso

Descriptor

Spanish painter and co-founder of cubism. Often regarded as one of the most well known painters of the twentieth century, Picasso's style forever changed the direction of art. His personal life is equally as fascinating and controversial as his art.


Books

Karmel, Pepe. Picasso and the Invention of Cubism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003.

Richardson, John. A Life of Picasso Volume I: 1881-1906. New York: Random House, 1991.

Richardson, John. A Life of Picasso Volume II: 1907-1917. New York: Random House, 1996.


Websites

Musee National Picasso

Cubism

Picasso Online Project

Picasso Estate

Picasso Bio


Franz Kafka

Descriptor

Controversial writer whose posthumously published works expressed his feelings on 20th Century man. Many of his works are unfinished and contain parts that stop mid-sentence. Rather than being a hindrance, such occurrences add to the allure and mystery of Kafka's writing. Most famous works include The Metamorphosis, The Trial, and The Castle.


Books

Brod, Max. Franz Kafka, A Biography. New York: Schocken Books, 1963.

Kafka, Franz. The Trial. Trans. Breon Mitchell. New York: Schocken, 1998.


Websites

The Kafka Project

Kafka Bio

Diaries of Kafka

Kafka: The Modern World

Kafka Museum


Ballet

Descriptor

Ballet's origins can be traced back to Renaissance Europe (approx. 1400-1600's). A formal dance technique known for its choreography, which includes mime, acting, and performances to music. Popular ballets include: The Nutcracker, The Sleeping Beauty, and Swan Lake.


Books

Kodicek, Ann. Diaghilev: Creator of the Ballet Russes. Great Britain: Barbican Art Gallery and Lund Humphries Publishers, 1996.

Joseph, Charles M. Stravinsky & Balanchine: A Journey of Invention. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2002.


Websites

History of Ballet

George Balanchine Foundation

School of American Ballet

Joffrey Ballet


Sergei Diaghilev

Descriptor

Ballet Impresario (financier), patron, and critic, Sergei Diaghilev almost spent his life as a lawyer. Instead, his interest in music and privileged background led him to found one of history's most influential ballet companies, the Ballets Russes. Many of ballet's best choreographers began their careers in the Ballets Russes. Examples include: George Balanchine, Léonide Massine, Bronislava Nijinska, and Vaslav Nijinsky. Diaghilev is also noted for using the musical talents of Igor Stravinsky in many of his ballets.


Books

Kodicek, Ann. Diaghilev: Creator of the Ballet Russes. Great Britain: Barbican Art Gallery and Lund Humphries Publishers, 1996.

Scheijen, Sjeng. Diaghilev: A life. Profile Books, 2009.


Websites

History of Ballet

NY Times- The Protean Master of the Ballets Russes

School of American Ballet

Sergei Diaghilev: first lord of the dance

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Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements Espionage Escapades.


Impresario: Sergei Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes


Fearless, strong-willed and always a champion of the modern, Sergei Diaghilev discovered a talented group of artists and inspired them to reach new creative heights. Diaghilev wasn't a dancer, choreographer or composer, but he was the impresario, and the show couldn't go on without him. Together, they shaped ballet into a new art form, leaving an indelible mark on art for the 20th Century. Produced and written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:28:13)


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Ballet: The Art of Dance


Beautiful and effortless, ballet is one of the world's most elegant art forms -- the human body as poetry in motion. Achieving and maintaining the artful illusion of ballet is all-important; but it's just that, an illusion meant to appear effortless. What kind of commitment does it take for dancers to master the unmistakable yet rigorous style of ballet? And where does that commitment lead young dancers in their pursuit of excellence? Produced and written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:32:16)


Franz Kafka's Dark Truth


Franz Kafka had made his living as an attorney in an insurance company, where he'd eked out an obscure and unexceptional life. But when the lawyer put pen to paper, the writer conjured a disturbing world where the absurd was commonplace and reality a nightmare. Since his death, Franz Kafka's work has become enormously influential. It remains unrivaled for its intensity, modernity and prescience. Produced and written by Adam Sternberg.

Running Time: (0:31:21)

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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: Espionage Escapades

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in Espionage Escapades.


For men used to mining - fighting in trenches was seen as an escape FROM HELL

express.co.uk
6/1/2014

These days, however, Big Pit digs tourism, not coal; the party descending into the earth are American visitors. There are no working deep-mines remaining in South Wales; already in decline, the area's coalfield was annihilated in the wake of the 1984-5 Miners' Strike, the names of the closed collieries to toll like funeral bells. Mardy. Tower. Deep Navigation. Markham. Lady Windsor. How black was my valley a century ago, on the eve of the Great War, when there were a dozen collieries within sight, and another 600 coal mines across South Wales, employing 232,000 men, who hewed 57 million tons a year, a fifth of the entire output of the United Kingdom. The very earth vibrated to the metronomic percussion of thousands of subterranean men wielding the pick. Coal for the Navy. Coal for industry. Coal for locomotives. Coal for homes.


The ten men who shaped the road to war

independent.ie
5/10/2014

1 HORATIO KITCHENER As the first British troops marched whistling off to the front in autumn 1914 the cliche of the hour was: "It'll be all over by Christmas." An experienced campaigner on three continents, Horatio Kitchener from Ballylongford, Co Kerry, knew it would be a long haul. As Secretary of State for War he put together the largest volunteer army the world had ever seen, and put industrial production on an efficient war footing.


Help Transcribe Diaries From World War I

Smithsonian.com
3/18/2014

The National Archives currently has in its collection 1.5 million pages of handwritten diaries kept by soldiers of World War I. They're some of the most requested documents in the National Archives reading room, but until now have been accessible only to anyone who's made the trip to D.C. But now the archivisits are working to put them online, and you can help them. The project is called Operation War Diary, and it comes from a partnership between the National Archives, the citizen science initiative Zooniverse and the Imperial War Museum in the UK. The diaries have all been scanned and posted online for citizen historians to look at and transcribe. According to the project: "The war diaries contain a wealth of information of far greater interest than the army could ever have predicted. They provide unrivalled insight into daily events on the front line, and are full of fascinating detail about the decisions that were made and the activities that resulted from them."


World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

bbc.com
2/11/2014

No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most. It alone had power to halt the descent to disaster at any time in July 1914 by withdrawing its "blank cheque" which offered support to Austria for its invasion of Serbia. I'm afraid I am unconvinced by the argument that Serbia was a rogue state which deserved its nemesis at Austria's hands. And I do not believe Russia wanted a European war in 1914 - its leaders knew that it would have been in a far stronger position to fight two years later, having completed its rearmament programme.


World War One: The circus animals that helped Britain

bbc.com
11/10/2013

On the cobbled streets of industrial Sheffield an Indian elephant dutifully lumbered along. Her task was important - she had to cart munitions, machines and scrap metal around the city, a job previously done by three horses taken off to war. Lizzie - as she was known - was used to performing tricks as part of a travelling menagerie. But with the outbreak of World War One she was conscripted to help with heavy labour, fitted with a harness and sent to work at a scrap metal merchants.


German Subs: Sunken WWI U-Boats a Bonanza for Historians

abcnew.com
6/21/2013

British archaeologists recently discovered more than 40 German U-boats sunk during World War I off the coast of England. Now they are in a race against time to learn the secrets hidden in their watery graves. On the old game show "What's My Line?" Briton Mark Dunkley might have been described with the following words: "He does what many adventurers around the world can only dream of doing." Dunkley is an underwater archeologist who dives for lost treasures. His most recent discoveries were anything if not eerie.


The CIA Burglar Who Went Rogue

Smithsonian.com
10/3/2012

The six CIA officers were sweating. It was almost noon on a June day in the Middle Eastern capital, already in the 90s outside and even hotter inside the black sedan where the five men and one woman sat jammed in together. Sat and waited.


An Unforgettable Photo of Martha Graham

Smithsonian.com
6/1/2011

Barbara Morgan's 1940 image of Martha Graham in the ballet Letter to the World may be the most famous photograph ever taken of an American dancer. It ranks, in honor, with Ansel Adams' photographs of Yosemite and Walker Evans' of small-town churches, and it bears much the same message: Americans' belief in the flinty, frank truth of their vision of life, as opposed, say, to European decorativeness and indirection.


Australia's oldest man, World War I veteran Claude Choules dies at 110

perthnow.com.au
5/5/2011

WA's national treasure Claude Choules, Australia's oldest man and the world's last surviving World War I veteran, has died in Perth aged 110. Mr Choules was a man who made the best of life and devoted himself to his family and country. His fighting spirit helped him survive two world wars, and also live long enough to become the oldest man in WA and the last World War I veteran living in Australia.


CIA recipe for invisible ink among newly released WWI-era documents

washingtonpost.com
4/19/2011

So you want to open sealed envelopes without getting caught? Here's the secret, according to one of the six oldest classified documents in possession of the Central Intelligence Agency: "Mix 5 drams copper acetol arsenate. 3 ounces acetone and add 1 pint amyl alcohol (fusil-oil). Heat in water bath - steam rising will dissolve the sealing material of its mucilage, wax or oil." But there's a warning for the intrepid spy: "Do not inhale fumes."


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Suggested Lessons


Adventures in the Secret Service | Espionage Escapades | Daredevils of the Desert
Young Indy Home