Chapter Sixteen: Tales of Innocence

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Chapter Overview

In this comedic tale set high in the Italian Alps, Indy finds himself fighting not only Germans, but for the heart of a beautiful Italian girl. Still working as a spy, Indy is charged with sneaking behind enemy lines to lead a small group of defecting German soldiers into allied territory. Between missions Indy races to his innocent and beautiful Guiletta, only to discover that there is another suitor challenging his love. Distraught over the possibility of losing yet another love, Indy seeks advice from an ambulance driver named Ernest Hemingway.
Indy is then forced to leave Italy for Africa, when he is dispatched to go undercover in the French Foreign Legion to investigate how French weapons are falling into the hands of the enemy. This adventure places Indy with famed author, Edith Wharton, and future storyteller, Lowell Thomas.

Key Topics:

WWI in Italy & Africa; Ernest Hemingway; The French Foreign Legion; Journalism

Historic People:

Ernest Hemingway—WWI veteran, and acclaimed American author.
Edith Wharton—Famed novelist who wrote about the darker side of high society America.
Lowell Thomas—American storyteller, showman, adventurer, and media pioneer. Created the documentary With Allenby in Palestine and Lawrence in Arabia, which brought fame to himself & T.E. Lawrence.

People and Topics


Ernest Hemingway

Descriptor

WWI veteran, and acclaimed American author who was awarded with the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Pulitzer Prize. Forever battling depression, Hemingway ended his life in 1961. Works include: The Torrents of Spring, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea.


Books

Hemingway: Life into Art. New York: Cooper Square Press, 2000.

Wagner-Martin, Linda, ed. A Historical Guide to Ernest Hemingway. New York:Oxford University Press, Inc., 2000.

Reynolds, Michael. The Young Hemingway. New York:W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1998.


Websites

Hemingway Archive at JFK Library

Hemingway Society- Oak Park

Hemingway in His Own Time

PBS- Hemingway Bio

Michael Palin's Hemingway Adventure

Nobel Prize- Hemingway Bio


The French Foreign Legion

Descriptor

The FFL was formed in 1831 to allow foreigners to join the French Army. The purpose was to allow non-French soldiers to join in France's quest to expand its growing empire. The FFL exists to this day.


Books

Geraghty, Tony. March or Die: A New History of the French Foreign Legion. New york: Facts on File Publications, 1986.

Salazar, Jamie. Legion of the Lost: The True Experience of an American in the French Foreign Legion. New York: The Berkeley Publishing Group, 2005.


Websites

Foreign Legion Official Website

Life in the FFL

De Gaulle's Address After the Military Insurrection in Algeria

FFL in the 21st Century


Edith Wharton

Descriptor

Famed novelist who wrote about the darker side of high society America. Popular works include: Ethan Frome, The House of Mirth, & The Age of Innocence.


Books

Benstock, Shari. No Gifts From Chance: A Biography of Edith Wharton. New York: Scribners, 1994.

Dwight, Eleanor. Edith Wharton: An Extraordinary Life. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 1994.


Websites

Edith Wharton Society

Wharton at The Mount Estate & Gardens

Wharton Timeline

NPG- Wharton Bio


Lowell Thomas

Descriptor

American storyteller, showman, adventurer, and media pioneer. Created the documentary With Allenby in Palestine and Lawrence in Arabia, which brought fame to himself & T.E. Lawrence.


Books

Thomas, Lowell. With Lawrence in Arabia. Garden City, New york: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1967.

Bowen, Norman R., ed. Lowell Thomas, The Stranger Everyone Knows. Garden City, New york: Doubleday & Company, 1968.


Websites

PBS- Lowell Thomas Bio

Lowell Thomas Museum

High Adventure with Lowell Thomas

Radio Hall of Fame

The Vichy Regime

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Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements Tales of Innocence.


Unhealed Wounds: The Life of Ernest Hemingway


Ernest Hemingway was the best-selling, most celebrated author of his time. He wove war, love, pain and death into unforgettable patchworks of prose, and sought adventure and craved risk. Behind a cheerful façade were wounds much deeper than any physical ones sustained in an eventful lifetime. Hemingway battled devastating personal wounds he found impossible to shake. Produced and Written by Karena O'Riordan.

Running Time: (0:34:55)

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The French Foreign Legion: The World's Most Legendary Fighting Force


For almost two hundred years one group of fighting men has held an unrivaled grip on the world's imagination. Shadowy pasts have made them outcasts. Glorious victories have made them heroes. And bitter defeats -- often in hopeless battles to the death -- have transformed them into legends. They are the men of the French Foreign Legion. Today, the mystique that surrounds these unusual soldiers still fascinates, still draws young men to enlist in their ranks. Produced by Mark Page and Jennifer Petrucelli. Written by Mark Page.

Running Time: (0:28:22)

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The Secret Life of Edith Wharton


In 1905, all of New York was riveted by the story of Lily Bart, a stunning young woman hoping to claim her place in society through marriage to a wealthy man. As her prospects for marriage unraveled, Lily's life spiraled downward. No longer the toast of New York society, she ended up in a rooming house, alone and penniless. After drinking an overdose of sleeping medication, she died. This tragic figure whose story so captivated New York was not real. She was a character in the novel The House of Mirth. The writer who exposed the dark side of High Society was herself a member of it; Edith Wharton was in a unique position to chronicle -- and critique the upper class. She did -- mercilessly -- and her literary success came at a price. Produced and Written by Betsy Bayha.

Running Time: (0:30:35)

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Lowell Thomas: American Storyteller


Over the course of his illustrious career, Lowell Thomas was an adventurer, a showman, the most familiar voice in radio, a television personality and a media pioneer. He was one of the first to be called a newscaster, but through it all, one thing always was true about Lowell Thomas: he was a supreme storyteller. Produced and Written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:29:17)


The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: Tales of Innocence

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in Tales of Innocence.


Help Transcribe Diaries From World War I

Smithsonian.com
3/18/2014

The National Archives currently has in its collection 1.5 million pages of handwritten diaries kept by soldiers of World War I. They're some of the most requested documents in the National Archives reading room, but until now have been accessible only to anyone who's made the trip to D.C. But now the archivisits are working to put them online, and you can help them. The project is called Operation War Diary, and it comes from a partnership between the National Archives, the citizen science initiative Zooniverse and the Imperial War Museum in the UK. The diaries have all been scanned and posted online for citizen historians to look at and transcribe. According to the project: "The war diaries contain a wealth of information of far greater interest than the army could ever have predicted. They provide unrivalled insight into daily events on the front line, and are full of fascinating detail about the decisions that were made and the activities that resulted from them."


World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

bbc.com
2/11/2014

No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most. It alone had power to halt the descent to disaster at any time in July 1914 by withdrawing its "blank cheque" which offered support to Austria for its invasion of Serbia. I'm afraid I am unconvinced by the argument that Serbia was a rogue state which deserved its nemesis at Austria's hands. And I do not believe Russia wanted a European war in 1914 - its leaders knew that it would have been in a far stronger position to fight two years later, having completed its rearmament programme.


World War One: The circus animals that helped Britain

bbc.com
11/10/2013

On the cobbled streets of industrial Sheffield an Indian elephant dutifully lumbered along. Her task was important - she had to cart munitions, machines and scrap metal around the city, a job previously done by three horses taken off to war. Lizzie - as she was known - was used to performing tricks as part of a travelling menagerie. But with the outbreak of World War One she was conscripted to help with heavy labour, fitted with a harness and sent to work at a scrap metal merchants.


My Lunch With Hemingway

Nationalgeographic.com
7/19/2013

World War II was over, I was out of the Air Force and out of college, and somehow I found myself in Havana, Cuba, selling flatware. This had little to do with becoming a writer, but there were compensations: the mystique of an alien culture, the balmy Caribbean, and the fact that my idol, Ernest Hemingway, lived there. But how could I ever meet this venerated celebrity? "Oh, you want to meet Papa?" said my new friend Roberto Herrera. Roberto was a Spaniard who had fled the Franco regime. "He goes everyday to El Floridita. I will arrange." To my astonishment, he did. Somehow, I knew that my life would be changed forever.


German Subs: Sunken WWI U-Boats a Bonanza for Historians

abcnew.com
6/21/2013

British archaeologists recently discovered more than 40 German U-boats sunk during World War I off the coast of England. Now they are in a race against time to learn the secrets hidden in their watery graves. On the old game show "What's My Line?" Briton Mark Dunkley might have been described with the following words: "He does what many adventurers around the world can only dream of doing." Dunkley is an underwater archeologist who dives for lost treasures. His most recent discoveries were anything if not eerie.


Rare World War I Images Found Inside Antique Camera By Photographer Anton Orlov

huffingtonpost.com
1/11/2013

A blogger passionate about historic photography techniques serendipitously found some old photos inside his newly-purchased camera. As in, World War I old. Last week, Anton Orlov of the Photo Palace blog was cleaning the Jumelle Belllieni stereoscopic camera that he'd bought at an antique store a few days prior, and found the images completely by accident. According to his blog, he opened the film chamber and saw the negatives on a stack of glass plates.


Disturbing Pathe footage from World War One reveals devastating effects of shell shock on soldiers as they were treated in pioneering Devon hospital

dailymail.co.uk
11/8/2012

Uncontrollable shaking, terrifying nightmares and severe convulsions were among the most devastating symptoms suffered by the many First World War soldiers who suffered shell shock. By the end of the war, more than 80,000 men who had endured the horrors of battle were struggling to return to normality. And here, disturbing footage compiled by British Pathé film archivists and released to MailOnline today, brings home the terrifying reality that for many the war never really ended. At the time, most shell shock victims were treated harshly and with little sympathy as their symptoms were not understood and they were seen as a sign of weakness. But at Newton Abbott's Seale Hayne in Devon, the approach was very different due to the revolutionary approach of a doctor called Arthur Hurst, an army major, who believed he could cure every shell shock victim.


First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been found as glacier melts

dailymail.co.uk
9/2/2012

First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been discovered in northern Italy. More than 200 pieces of the ammunition were revealed at an altitude of 3,200 metres by a melting glacier on the Ago de Nardis peak in Trentino. The 85-100mm caliber explosives weighed between seven and 10 kilos and explosives experts have been to the site to safely dispose of the weaponry.


First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been found as glacier melts

dailymail.co.uk
9/2/2012

First World War ammunition frozen in time for nearly a century has been discovered in northern Italy. More than 200 pieces of the ammunition were revealed at an altitude of 3,200 metres by a melting glacier on the Ago de Nardis peak in Trentino. The 85-100mm caliber explosives weighed between seven and 10 kilos and explosives experts have been to the site to safely dispose of the weaponry.


Document Deep Dive: What Did the Zimmermann Telegram Say?

Smithsonian.com
8/21/2012

On January 17, 1917, British code breakers in Room 40, the cryptoanalysis office of Great Britain’s Naval Intelligence, intercepted a telegram from Germany. At first, they suspected the coded message was a routine communication. But, soon enough, the cryptologists found that what they held in their hands was a top-secret missive that would shift the tides of World War I. Chances are that you have studied the Zimmermann Telegram in a history class, but have you ever actually seen the coded message? German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmermann sent the diplomatic message to Heinrich von Eckardt, the German ambassador in Mexico City, instructing him to speak to the president of Mexico. He proposed that the two nations strike an alliance; if Mexico waged war against the United States, thereby distracting Americans from the conflict in Europe, Germany would lend support and help Mexico reclaim Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


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