Chapter Eleven- Oganga: The Giver and Taker of Life

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Chapter Overview

While on mission in Africa, Indy is introduced to the plight of war torn Africa and the abuse of African soldiers by allied commanders. After coming across a village destroyed by disease, Indy discovers a lone surviving African child and endangers the lives of his fellow soldiers when he takes the child into his care. Realizing the futility of war, Indy begins to rethink his support for the Great War. As hope fades, Indy finds Dr. Albert Schweitzer and discovers that there is still good in people and hope for humanity.

Key Topics:

Disease & despair in war-torn Africa; Treatment of colonial soldiers

Historic People:

Albert Schweitzer-- Theologian, philosopher, and African mission doctor who received the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1952.
Barthelemy Boganda-- African nationalist leader during the decolonization period of the 1950's.

People and Topics


Albert Schweitzer

Descriptor

Theologian, philosopher, musician, and African mission doctor who received the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1952.


Books

Schweitzer, Albert. The Decay And The Restoration Of Civilization. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1923.

Brabazon, James. A Biography: Albert Schweitzer. New York: Syracuse University, 2000.


Websites

Nobel Prize- Schweitzer Bio

Albert Schweitzer Page

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer Fellowship


Barthelemy Boganda

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African nationalist leader during the decolonization period of the 1950's. After negotiating independence from France, Boganda served as the Central African Republic's first Prime Minister. Also an ordained Roman Catholic priest, Boganda died in 1959 when his airplane mysteriously crashed.


Books

Kalck, Pierre. Central African Republic: A Failure in De-Colonisation. Translated by Barbara Thomson. London: Pall Mall Press, 1971.

Le Vine, Victor T. Politics in Francophone Africa: The States of West and Equatorial Africa. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2004.


Websites

Time Magazine: Death of a Strongman

US State Department info on Central African Republic

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Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements Oganga: The Giver & Taker of Life.


Albert Schweitzer: Reverence for Life


In 1953, Albert Schweitzer won the Nobel Prize for peace, and magazines and newspaper articles were calling him "the greatest man in the world." He was one of the most unlikely candidates for such accolades -- having spent the majority of his life working as a doctor, tending to the poor in a remote corner of Africa. In addition to being a doctor, Schweitzer was a concert organist and a respected theologian, but it was for uncovering a simple philosophy that he won the Nobel Prize. He called his way of thinking and living "Reverence for Life." Produced and written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:29:47)

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Congo: A Curse of Riches


The Congo encompasses a million square miles of the richest land in Africa. Yet despite that wealth -- or perhaps because of it -- throughout their history the Congolese would nearly starve to death, economically and politically. Their vast riches would bring only suffering, corruption, and death. Produced and written by Karena O'Riordan.

Running Time: (0:32:39)


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Waging Peace: The Rise of Pacifism


As the 20th century approached, governments all over Europe were doing their best to win the deadly game of the arms race. But some of their subjects were beginning to fear that if the arms race led to a real war, there would be no victors. Modern weapons, argued the pacifists, had become too powerful, too destructive. If they were unleashed they might destroy Europe and roll back centuries of cultural, scientific and economic progress. Produced and written by Mark Page.

Running Time: (0:26:02)


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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: Oganga: The Giver and Taker of Life

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in Oganga: The Giver and Taker of Life.


First World War shell explodes at former Ypres battlefield killing two people

express.co.uk
3/19/2014

The shell exploded at a construction area in Ypres killing two workers and injuring two others. One person died instantly while the other died on the way to hospital and authorities said an investigation was taking place into the explosion. Ypres police chief Georges Aeck said: "It's a shell that exploded with four workers there, a conventional device from World War One. "One died instantly, another on the way to the hospital."


Help Transcribe Diaries From World War I

Smithsonian.com
3/18/2014

The National Archives currently has in its collection 1.5 million pages of handwritten diaries kept by soldiers of World War I. They're some of the most requested documents in the National Archives reading room, but until now have been accessible only to anyone who's made the trip to D.C. But now the archivisits are working to put them online, and you can help them. The project is called Operation War Diary, and it comes from a partnership between the National Archives, the citizen science initiative Zooniverse and the Imperial War Museum in the UK. The diaries have all been scanned and posted online for citizen historians to look at and transcribe. According to the project: "The war diaries contain a wealth of information of far greater interest than the army could ever have predicted. They provide unrivalled insight into daily events on the front line, and are full of fascinating detail about the decisions that were made and the activities that resulted from them."


Congo’s Civil Wars Took A Toll On Its Forests

Smithsonian.com
2/26/2014

War and civil strife have beset Congo since the African nation’s independence in 1960. That conflict has included two civil wars—in 1996-1997 and 1998-2003—and even now rebel groups continue to plague parts of the country. Millions were killed, and millions more were forced from their homes. These internally displaced persons numbered 3.4 million at their maximum in 2003, but approximately 2.7 million have yet to return due to ongoing violence, mostly in the eastern part of the country.


World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

bbc.com
2/11/2014

No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most. It alone had power to halt the descent to disaster at any time in July 1914 by withdrawing its "blank cheque" which offered support to Austria for its invasion of Serbia. I'm afraid I am unconvinced by the argument that Serbia was a rogue state which deserved its nemesis at Austria's hands. And I do not believe Russia wanted a European war in 1914 - its leaders knew that it would have been in a far stronger position to fight two years later, having completed its rearmament programme.


World War One: The circus animals that helped Britain

bbc.com
11/10/2013

On the cobbled streets of industrial Sheffield an Indian elephant dutifully lumbered along. Her task was important - she had to cart munitions, machines and scrap metal around the city, a job previously done by three horses taken off to war. Lizzie - as she was known - was used to performing tricks as part of a travelling menagerie. But with the outbreak of World War One she was conscripted to help with heavy labour, fitted with a harness and sent to work at a scrap metal merchants.


German Subs: Sunken WWI U-Boats a Bonanza for Historians

abcnew.com
6/21/2013

British archaeologists recently discovered more than 40 German U-boats sunk during World War I off the coast of England. Now they are in a race against time to learn the secrets hidden in their watery graves. On the old game show "What's My Line?" Briton Mark Dunkley might have been described with the following words: "He does what many adventurers around the world can only dream of doing." Dunkley is an underwater archeologist who dives for lost treasures. His most recent discoveries were anything if not eerie.


Rare World War I Images Found Inside Antique Camera By Photographer Anton Orlov

huffingtonpost.com
1/11/2013

A blogger passionate about historic photography techniques serendipitously found some old photos inside his newly-purchased camera. As in, World War I old. Last week, Anton Orlov of the Photo Palace blog was cleaning the Jumelle Belllieni stereoscopic camera that he'd bought at an antique store a few days prior, and found the images completely by accident. According to his blog, he opened the film chamber and saw the negatives on a stack of glass plates.


Disturbing Pathe footage from World War One reveals devastating effects of shell shock on soldiers as they were treated in pioneering Devon hospital

dailymail.co.uk
11/8/2012

Uncontrollable shaking, terrifying nightmares and severe convulsions were among the most devastating symptoms suffered by the many First World War soldiers who suffered shell shock. By the end of the war, more than 80,000 men who had endured the horrors of battle were struggling to return to normality. And here, disturbing footage compiled by British Pathé film archivists and released to MailOnline today, brings home the terrifying reality that for many the war never really ended. At the time, most shell shock victims were treated harshly and with little sympathy as their symptoms were not understood and they were seen as a sign of weakness. But at Newton Abbott's Seale Hayne in Devon, the approach was very different due to the revolutionary approach of a doctor called Arthur Hurst, an army major, who believed he could cure every shell shock victim.


Document Deep Dive: What Did the Zimmermann Telegram Say?

Smithsonian.com
8/21/2012

On January 17, 1917, British code breakers in Room 40, the cryptoanalysis office of Great Britain’s Naval Intelligence, intercepted a telegram from Germany. At first, they suspected the coded message was a routine communication. But, soon enough, the cryptologists found that what they held in their hands was a top-secret missive that would shift the tides of World War I. Chances are that you have studied the Zimmermann Telegram in a history class, but have you ever actually seen the coded message? German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmermann sent the diplomatic message to Heinrich von Eckardt, the German ambassador in Mexico City, instructing him to speak to the president of Mexico. He proposed that the two nations strike an alliance; if Mexico waged war against the United States, thereby distracting Americans from the conflict in Europe, Germany would lend support and help Mexico reclaim Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.


Hitler postcard found in World War I project

bbc.co.uk
5/2/2012

A previously unknown postcard sent by Adolf Hitler when he was a soldier in World War I has been uncovered in a European history project. Hitler's postcard, sent in 1916 when he was recovering from a war wound, was found in Munich, Germany. Oxford University is providing expert advice to the Europeana 1914-1918 project which runs history roadshows. When the postcard was identified, the university's Dr Stuart Lee said he "felt a shudder run through me". "I found it hard to believe that at a local event to record ordinary people's stories, I was seeing a previously unknown document in Hitler's own hand," said Dr Lee.


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


Phantom Train | Oganga: The Giver & Taker of Life | Attack of the Hawkmen
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