Chapter Two: Passion for Life

My First Adventure | Passion for Life | Perils of Cupid
Young Indy Home

Chapter Overview

While visiting the Louvre Museum in Paris, nine-year-old Indy meets young Norman Rockwell. Norman offers to show Indy the "real" artists' quarter in Paris, and the two set off on an adventure in Montmartre. In a bohemian café, they find themselves caught up in a humorous scheme of the brash young artist Pablo Picasso to prove to the aging Edgar Degas that Picasso can paint as well as Degas. The boys are invited to the famous banquet at Picasso's studio in honor of Henri Rousseau, and along the way they learn what Cubism is all about.

A year later, Indy and his family meet Theodore Roosevelt, former President of the United States, who is on safari in British East Africa (now Kenya). Roosevelt is on an official expedition sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution to collect specimens for the National Museum in Washington. Indy befriends a Massai boy and learns about the ecology chain from a Massai elder. He helps locate a rare species of antelope that Roosevelt is seeking, but also learns how the enthusiasm for hunting causes the unnecessary slaughter of rare animals.

Key Topics:

“Art appreciation” lessons with iconic painters; lesson in environmental conservation while on safari with Teddy Roosevelt (this film can easily be divided into two separate lessons; each stands alone very well!)

Historic People:

Theodore Roosevelt-- 26th President of the US, war hero, naturalist, explorer, author, and Nobel Prize recipient.
Norman Rockwell-- iconic American illustrator
Pablo Picasso-- Spanish-born artist who was a founder of cubism and considered one of the masters of modern art
George Braque-- French painter who utilized cubism in his art
Edgar Degas-- French painter who was a founder of Impressionism
Henri Rousseau-- French painter known for primitive or folk-art

People and Topics


Theodore Roosevelt

Descriptor

The 26th President of the US who is respected as one of the most influential and progressive executives to ever hold office. A well-known naturalist, Roosevelt is remembered for preserving thousands of acres for National Parks & Forests. He is also viewed as the president who brought America into the 20th Century and made it a major player in world trade & politics.


Books

Dalton, Kathleen. Theodore Roosevelt, A Strenuous Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2002.

Morris, Edmund. Theodore Rex. New York: Modern Library, 2002.

Theodore Roosevelt's Diaries of Boyhood and Youth. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1928.


Websites

LOC- Roosevelt on Video

BBC- TR Bio

White House Bio of TR

Theodore Roosevelt Association

1906 Nobel Prize


Pablo Picasso

Descriptor

Spanish painter and co-founder of cubism. Often regarded as one of the most recognizable painters of the twentieth century, Picasso's style forever changed the direction of art. His personal life is equally as fascinating and controversial as his art.


Books

Karmel, Pepe. Picasso and the Invention of Cubism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003.

Richardson, John. A Life of Picasso Volume I: 1881-1906. New York: Random House, 1991.

Richardson, John. A Life of Picasso Volume II: 1907-1917. New York: Random House, 1996.


Websites

Musee National Picasso

Cubism

Picasso Online Project

Picasso Estate

Picasso Bio


Norman Rockwell

Descriptor

Iconic American painter best known for his Saturday Evening Post cover illustrations that depicted everyday American life. Rockwell produced more than 4000 original works, most of which were destroyed or are currently in permanent collections. His most well-known illustrations include:
Rosie the Riveter (1943)
The Four Freedoms (1943)
The Marriage License (1955)
The Runaway (1958)
Triple Self-Portrait (1960)
The Problem We All Live With (1964)


Books

Claridge, Laura Norman Rockwell, A Life. New York: Random House, 2001.

Finch, Christopher. Norman Rockwell's America. New York: Harry M. Abrams, 1985.


Websites

Rockwell Official Site

The Norman Rockwell Museum

Rockwell Museum Vermont

PBS- Rockwell Bio


Edgar Degas

Descriptor

French painter and sculptor who was a founder of Impressionism. Degas is best known for his paintings of dancers and dancing, but was skilled at capturing modern life. His most famous paintings include:
New Orleans Cotton Exchange
The Dance Class
Place de la Concorde


Books

Carandente, Giovanni Degas. New York: Avenel Books, 1979.

Boggs, Jean Sutherland. Artists in Focus: Degas. Chicago: Art Institute of Chicago, 1996.


Websites

Metropolitan Museum of Art- Degas

Analysis of The Dance Lesson

Degas at the Races

National Gallery of Art- Degas


Ecology

Descriptor

As our planet continues to grow and flourish, humans tirelessly innovate and develop technology. Too often we ignore the consequences of progress and damage the very planet we call home. Whether it's destroying an ecosystem or expanding the hole in the Ozone layer, we have a duty to understand our planet and try to save it.


Books

Ponting, Clive A Green History of the World. New York: Penguin Books, USA Inc., 1991.

Fifty Simple Things You Can Do to Save the Earth. Ashland, OR: Earthworks Press, 1989.


Websites

Ecology Global Network

Earthday Network

History of the Conservation Movement

Science Daily- Ecology

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements Passion for Life.


Theodore Roosevelt and The American Century


Known during his time as "the American Lion," Theodore Roosevelt led the U.S. into the 20th Century. He was the first president to travel abroad, the first to travel on an airplane -- a grandiose figure of huge personality, Roosevelt led enough life and followed enough passions for five lifetimes. One of his many legacies is the move towards conserving the nation's abundant natural resources for future generations. Produced and Written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:30:50)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
No video? Watch in Flash!


Ecology: Pulse of the Planet


As far as we know, planet Earth stands alone as a cradle of life in the universe. Ecological efforts strive to protect the balance that fosters that life. In this documentary, see the important role humans play as stewards of the planet's health, correcting the mistakes of the past century, with specific examples from northern California. Produced and Written by David O'Dell.

Running Time: (0:24:12)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
No video? Watch in Flash!


American Dreams: Normal Rockwell & The Saturday Evening Post


Perhaps no artist came to capture the optimistic spirit of America in the first half of the 20th Century better than Norman Rockwell. In an era before television became the mass medium that united the nation, Americans turned to the pages of The Saturday Evening Post to learn about themselves and the world abroad. Facing them on the covers of the most popular issues was a perfectly frozen picture of Americana captured by Rockwell. And yet for all his achievements, he never took comfortably to the label "artist." Produced and Written by Mark Page.

Running Time: (0:24:17)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
No video? Watch in Flash!


Art Rebellion: The Making of the Modern


Paris in the last half of the 19th Century was a city on the move. It was a modern metropolis expanding into the future, with electric lights and steel towers. And yet its art was just as staid as it had been for the past 300 years. None of energy and innovation was translated onto the backwards-looking canvas. But some passionate young artists were about to rise up in revolt, to express an edgy new personal vision that would forever change art and the way we see the modern world. Produced and Written by Mark Page.

Running Time: (0:26:06)


Exclusive Documentary Preview!
No video? Watch in Flash!


Edgar Degas: Reluctant Rebel


Among the ranks of fed-up young artists reshaping the world of modern art was Edgar Degas. At the heart of the movement, Degas stood alone as coming from an aristocratic and wealthy family, unlike his more earthy compatriots. Yet he still managed to shock the art world by observing and painting his fellow Parisians in everyday life. His work with the female nude was particularly striking and scandalous, as he never posed his subjects as "classical artists" would. Political and socially conservative, Degas would nonetheless be branded as a rebel for his landmark works. Produced and Written by Mark Page.Produced and Written by Sharon Wood.

Running Time: (0:22:53)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
No video? Watch in Flash!


Braque & Picasso: A Collaboration Cubed


Enthusiasts of maverick artist Pablo Picasso will readily credit him and him alone for envisioning the bold new form of cubism, but a much quieter yet no less integral artist deserves equal mention. George Braque and Pablo Picasso enjoyed a close, collaborative relationship fueled by competitiveness, as each of their new works served as inspiration for the next great achievement. This documentary examines the relationship between Picasso and Braque and the remarkable outcome of their collaboration. Produced and Written by Mark Page.

Running Time: (0:23:14)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
No video? Watch in Flash!


The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: Passion for Life

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in Passion for Life.


Climate Change Felt in Deep Waters of Antarctica

Smithsonian.com
3/3/2014

In 1974, just a couple years after the launch of the first Landsat satellite, scientists noticed something odd in the Weddell Sea near Antarctica. There was a large ice-free area, called a polynya, in the middle of the ice pack. The polynya, which covered an area as large as New Zealand, reappeared in the winters of 1975 and 1976 but has not been seen since.


Congo’s Civil Wars Took A Toll On Its Forests

Smithsonian.com
2/26/2014

War and civil strife have beset Congo since the African nation’s independence in 1960. That conflict has included two civil wars—in 1996-1997 and 1998-2003—and even now rebel groups continue to plague parts of the country. Millions were killed, and millions more were forced from their homes. These internally displaced persons numbered 3.4 million at their maximum in 2003, but approximately 2.7 million have yet to return due to ongoing violence, mostly in the eastern part of the country.


It's Time to Accept That Elephants, Like Us, Are Empathetic Beings

Nationalgeographic.com
2/21/2014

Elephants, we all know, are in peril. We humans are waging what amounts to a war against them because they have something we want and cannot make on our own: ivory. Earlier this month, we learned that the West African country of Gabon has lost more than half its elephants—11,000—in the last ten years alone. People are shooting, poisoning, and spearing the animals at such a rate across the continent that some scientists already consider them "ecologically extinct." There are now fewer than 500,000 wild African elephants—maybe no more than half that number—and barely 32,000 Asian elephants.


How the Monuments Men Saved Italy’s Treasures

Smithsonian.com
1/15/2014

Swam through the sea a crescent of sunwashed white houses, lavender hillsides and rust red roofs, and a high campanile whose bells, soft across the water, stole to the mental ear. No country in the world has, for me, the breathtaking beauty of Italy.” It was the fall of 1943. A couple of months earlier, the Sicilian landings of July 10 had marked the beginning of the Allied Italian campaign. The two British officers, who had met and become instant friends during the recently concluded push to drive the Germans from North Africa, were assigned to the Allied Military Government for Occupied Territories (AMGOT), which took over control of Italy as the country was being liberated by the Allies. Edward “Teddy” Croft-Murray, who in civilian life was a curator of prints and drawings at the British Museum in London, belonged to the small Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) unit inside AMGOT. Its task—dramatized in George Clooney’s new film, The Monuments Men, celebrating the unit’s exploits—would be to safeguard landmarks and works of art from war damage. Croft-Murray had, Fielden wrote in his memoirs, a “twinkling eye in a large face which was attached to the most untidy imaginable body...the Ancient Monument he called himself. God be praised, I said, for someone like this.”


Introducing a Special Report on Energy

Smithsonian.com
5/25/2013

In a world hungry for power, a new wealth of innovation hopes to keep the engine of industry running for the foreseeable future.


Five Innovative Technologies that Bring Energy to the Developing World

Smithsonian.com
5/2/2013

In the wealthy world, improving the energy system generally means increasing the central supply of reliable, inexpensive and environmentally-friendly power and distributing it through the power grid. Across most of the planet, though, simply providing new energy sources to the millions who are without electricity and depend on burning wood or kerosene for heat and light would open up new opportunities.


New Study Examines San Joaquin Valley, Home to America’s Dirtiest Air

Smithsonian.com
3/8/2013

If you had to guess what part of the the U.S. has the very worst air pollution–where winds and topography conspire with fumes from gasoline-chugging vehicles to create an aerial cesspool–places like Los Angeles, Atlanta and as of late, Salt Lake City, would probably pop to mind. The reality may come as a bit of a surprise. According to the Environmental Protection agency, California’s bucolic San Joaquin Valley is “home of the worst air quality in the country.” Not coincidentally, the San Joaquin Valley is also the most productive agricultural region in the world and the top dairy-producing region in the country. Heavy duty-diesel trucks constantly buzz through the valley, emitting 14 tons of the greenhouse gas ozone daily, and animal feed spews a whopping 25 tons of ozone per day as it ferments, according to a 2010 study. In addition, hot summertime temperatures encourage ground-level ozone to form, according to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District. Pollution also streams down from the Bay Area, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the east help to trap all of these pollutants near the valley floor. Particulate matter that creates the thick greyish-brown smog hanging over the valley is of paramount concern–it’s been linked to heart disease, childhood asthma and other respiratory conditions.


Parched Middle East Faces Severe Water Crisis

Smithsonian.com
2/15/2013

Climate change, believed to have contributed to the decline of the Ottoman Empire (PDF) when drought forced villagers into a nomadic life in the late 16th century, is once again having an adverse affect on the Middle East. Precipitation has dropped off and temperatures have climbed for the past 40 years, with conditions growing especially severe in the last decade. A 2012 Yale study (PDF) showed that a drought from 2007 to 2010 so seriously stunted agriculture in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins that hundreds of thousands of people fled Iran, eastern Syria and northern Iraq.


14 Pygmy Elephants Die Mysteriously in Borneo

Nationalgeographic.com
1/31/2013

Fourteen endangered Borneo pygmy elephants have recently been found dead in a Malaysian forest, presenting a mystery for wildlife officials and conservationists. The recent deaths highlight the vulnerable status of the species, which now numbers about 1,500 animals. Scientists don't know how many pygmy elephants previously existed on the island, although it's likely the population wasn't much higher than it is today, said Barney Long, head of Asian species conservation at WWF-US. This week Malaysian authorities discovered a group of elephant carcasses close together in the Gunung Rara Forest Reserve, located in the northeastern corner of Borneo (map), a Southeast Asian island shared by Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei.


Water Demand for Energy to Double by 2035

Nationalgeographic.com
1/30/2013

The amount of fresh water consumed for world energy production is on track to double within the next 25 years, the International Energy Agency (IEA) projects. And even though fracking—high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of underground rock formations for natural gas and oil—might grab headlines, IEA sees its future impact as relatively small. By far the largest strain on future water resources from the energy system, according to IEA's forecast, would be due to two lesser noted, but profound trends in the energy world: soaring coal-fired electricity, and the ramping up of biofuel production


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.


My First Adventure | Passion for Life | Perils of Cupid
Young Indy Home