Chapter Ten: Phantom Train of Doom

Demons of Deception | Phantom Train of Doom | Oganga: The Giver & Taker of Life
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Chapter Overview

The futility of the Western Front convinces Indy to request transfer to Africa, where he hopes the war has more meaning and movement. Once in Africa, the familiarities of trenches have no time to sink in as Indy is sent on a mission to find the elusive and destructive Phantom Train of Doom. To accomplish his mission, Indy teams up with some of the allies, older, but wilier leaders in this fast-paced adventure that takes Indy and his cohorts all over East Africa. In true Indy fashion the group slips behind enemy lines to fire off the Phantom Train one last time.
Elusive targets seem to be a forte for Indy as he is quickly sent off to track down and capture the foxy German General, Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck. Whether by carriage, hot air balloon, or on foot, Indy manages to overcome the harsh African terrain to capture the General, only to face giant termites, lions, natives… and his father?

Key Topics:

World War I in Africa; German Artillery

Historic People:

Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck-- German commander in Africa whose guerilla tactics kept the allies trailing him throughout the war.
Jan Christian Smuts-- South African military leader who led British soldiers in East Africa; later Prime Minister of South Africa.
Frederick Selous-- Famed African hunter.

People and Topics


Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck

Descriptor

German commander in Africa whose guerilla and elusive tactics kept the allies trailing him throughout the war. Vorbeck knew that the Africa Campaign was merely a "sideshow" to the Western Front and became determined to do everything he could to tie the British down in Africa. This effort removed British soldiers and precious supplies from Europe. Vorbeck is hailed as the only German General to emerge from WWI undefeated.


Books

Von Lettow-Vorbeck, Paul. My Reminincenses of East Africa: The Campaign for German East Africa in World War I. Nashville: Battery Classics.

Strachan, Hew. The First World War in Africa. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.


Websites

FirstWorldWarI.com Vorbeck Bio

Vorbeck Timeline

US Army War College Paper


Jan Christian Smuts

Descriptor

South African military leader who led British soldiers in East Africa during WWI and later served in Britain's War Cabinet under Winston Churchill during WWII. Revered as a hero, Smuts twice served as Prime Minister of his native South Africa. Smuts is often remembered as a white supremacist in South Africa, however, it was his support against racial segregation that pushed him out of office and led to new leadership that ushered in the era of apartheid. Smuts' roles in white supremacy and apartheid continue to spark debate.


Books

Cameron, Trewhella. Jan Smuts: An Illustrated Biography. Capetown: Human & Rousseau Ltd., 1994.

Hancock, W.K. Smuts: The Sanguine Years, 1870-1919. London: Cambridge University, 1962.


Websites

Spartacus Ed. Smuts Bio

FirstWorldWarI.com Smuts Bio

Smuts Bio

SAHistory Smuts Bio


Frederick Selous

Descriptor

Famed African hunter and conservationist. Selous' exploits in South Africa inspired H. Rider Haggard to create the character Allan Quartermain for his novel King Solomon's Mines and its numerous prequels/sequels. The character of Allan Quartermain was portrayed by Sean Connery in the 2003 film, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.


Books

Casada, James A, ed. Africa's Greatest Hunter: The Lost Writings of Frederick C. Selous. Long Beach: Safari Press, 1998.

Taylor, Stephen. The Mighty Nimrod: A Life of Frederick Courteney Selous. London: William Collins Sons and Co., Ltd., 1989.


Websites

Selous Bio

Africanmeccasafaris.com/Selous Bio

Selous WWI Timeline

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Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Documentary Previews

Below you will find information about each documentary that supplements Phantom Train of Doom.


Chasing the Phantom: Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck


The war in East Africa was far different from the hell of the Western Front. The stories that emerged there had a human dimension, where individuals could actually put their imprint on this war. One of the most memorable and notable legends to emerge was German Colonel Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck, who led his German troops in a game of cat and mouse against the British over hundreds of miles of harsh African terrain, a game von Lettow had nearly always won. Produced and written by Karena O'Riordan.

Running Time: (0:24:53)

Exclusive Documentary Preview!
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Dreaming of Africa: The Life of Frederick Selous


Frederick Selous was a hunter, explorer, and celebrated author. Most of all, he was the envy of thrill-seekers everywhere, who coveted his life of mystery and danger. So large a figure was he that no less than Theodore Roosevelt considered him a hero. But when Selous first set foot in Africa decades earlier, he was a lost teenager with a big dream of finding adventure on the African continent. He had no idea what lay ahead. Produced and written by Karena O'Riordan.

Running Time: (0:25:06)

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At Home and Abroad: The Two Faces of Jan Smuts


As the only man to sign both the Treaty of Versailles at the end of World War I and the Paris Peace Treaty that brought an end to World War II, Jan Christiaan Smuts was a voice for democracy and freedom. He also helped draft the charter of the United Nations. But back in his native South Africa, Smuts' policies were anything but forward-thinking. This man gifted with insight and charisma did not use these talents to push for a more inclusive racial vision, which could have saved the country decades of trauma and strife. Produced by Adam Sternberg. Written by Adam Sternberg and Lisa Clark.

Running Time: (0:32:16)

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The above descriptors were acquired from Starwars.com

Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Indy Connections: Phantom Train of Doom

Below are current event articles that relate to events, topics, and people found in Phantom Train of Doom.


Trench Warfare in World War I Was a Smarter Strategy Than You Realize

io9.com
9/22/2014

History remembers trench warfare as wasteful, futile, and uninspired, but in reality it was a deeply thought-out system that underwent constant revision. Here's how it worked during World War I.
Top image: A painting by Captain Kenneth Keith Forbes shows a Canadian 6-inch howitzer supporting British troops in the attack on Thiepval on 16 July 1916 during the Somme offensive. Via Canadian Artillery in Action.
It was around this time 100 years ago that the mobile battlefield along the Western Front ground to a screeching halt — a 440 mile stretch that barely moved in the ensuing four years.


First World War: how Telegraph readers saw it

telegraph.co.uk
9/2/2014

Everyone knows about the horrors of life in the trenches of the First World War, but it’s only recently that the anxieties of people back home in Britain have started to be talked about.
At long last, those feelings are being aired more widely, thanks to a new anthology of letters written, at the time, to The Daily Telegraph. The message these missives impart is of a nation that was desperate to provide support, of any kind, to our brave boys fighting on just the other side of the Channel.


First World War centenary: how the events of August 2 1914 unfolded

telegraph.co.uk
8/2/2014

Britain went to war on August 4 1914. In the second part of a four-day series, we document the dramatic events leading up to the declaration of war as they happened, hour-by-hour.


A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: ‘We desire no conquest, no dominion. The world must be made safe for democracy’

independent.co.uk
6/5/2014

A light rain was falling on the evening of 2 April 1917 as Woodrow Wilson was driven from the White House to Capitol Hill, escorted by a unit of the United States cavalry, to address a specially convened joint session of Congress. According to contemporary accounts, the 28th president looked pale and nervous. But his words betrayed not the slightest doubt or hesitancy.


World War One: Tyne and Wear's shipbuilding prowess

bbc.com
6/4/2014

World War One is remembered as the first industrial war. A clash of furnace and factory as much as flesh and blood. The chimneys and cranes of this war machine consumed landscapes across Europe. And few were more dominated than the 12 miles of the River Tyne, from the North Sea to the west of Newcastle, devoted to building the world's ships. It is estimated more than three million tonnes of shipping were built in the yards here, on the nearby River Wear and in other north east yards, from 1914 to 1918.


For men used to mining - fighting in trenches was seen as an escape FROM HELL

express.co.uk
6/1/2014

These days, however, Big Pit digs tourism, not coal; the party descending into the earth are American visitors. There are no working deep-mines remaining in South Wales; already in decline, the area's coalfield was annihilated in the wake of the 1984-5 Miners' Strike, the names of the closed collieries to toll like funeral bells. Mardy. Tower. Deep Navigation. Markham. Lady Windsor. How black was my valley a century ago, on the eve of the Great War, when there were a dozen collieries within sight, and another 600 coal mines across South Wales, employing 232,000 men, who hewed 57 million tons a year, a fifth of the entire output of the United Kingdom. The very earth vibrated to the metronomic percussion of thousands of subterranean men wielding the pick. Coal for the Navy. Coal for industry. Coal for locomotives. Coal for homes.


We all know the classic First World War films - but what of flops and political embarrassments?

independent.co.uk
5/28/2014

Movie legends including Charlie Chaplin, Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg have attempted to tackle the First World War, but while some have achieved Oscars and box-office success, others have delayed peace talks and enraged renowned world leaders. One of the most famous films, A Farewell to Arms (1932), directed by Frank Borzage, has been digitally restored and is due for re-release in UK cinemas tomorrow.


The ten men who shaped the road to war

independent.ie
5/10/2014

1 HORATIO KITCHENER As the first British troops marched whistling off to the front in autumn 1914 the cliche of the hour was: "It'll be all over by Christmas." An experienced campaigner on three continents, Horatio Kitchener from Ballylongford, Co Kerry, knew it would be a long haul. As Secretary of State for War he put together the largest volunteer army the world had ever seen, and put industrial production on an efficient war footing.


First World War shell explodes at former Ypres battlefield killing two people

express.co.uk
3/19/2014

The shell exploded at a construction area in Ypres killing two workers and injuring two others. One person died instantly while the other died on the way to hospital and authorities said an investigation was taking place into the explosion. Ypres police chief Georges Aeck said: "It's a shell that exploded with four workers there, a conventional device from World War One. "One died instantly, another on the way to the hospital."


Help Transcribe Diaries From World War I

Smithsonian.com
3/18/2014

The National Archives currently has in its collection 1.5 million pages of handwritten diaries kept by soldiers of World War I. They're some of the most requested documents in the National Archives reading room, but until now have been accessible only to anyone who's made the trip to D.C. But now the archivisits are working to put them online, and you can help them. The project is called Operation War Diary, and it comes from a partnership between the National Archives, the citizen science initiative Zooniverse and the Imperial War Museum in the UK. The diaries have all been scanned and posted online for citizen historians to look at and transcribe. According to the project: "The war diaries contain a wealth of information of far greater interest than the army could ever have predicted. They provide unrivalled insight into daily events on the front line, and are full of fascinating detail about the decisions that were made and the activities that resulted from them."


Disclaimer: All resources (including books and websites) provided on indyintheclassroom.com are intended to be used by educators. Indyintheclassroom.com is not responsible for the content on linked websites.
Educators are strongly advised to review any resources prior to allowing student use.

Copyright: All images on Indyintheclassroom.com are used with permission or are in the public domain. Exceptions are noted. For additional information see our Copyright section.

Suggested Lessons


Demons of Deception | Phantom Train of Doom | Oganga: The Giver & Taker of Life
Young Indy Home